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The Opioid Crisis' Hidden Victims: Children in Foster Care 8Jan
2018

The Opioid Crisis' Hidden Victims: Children in Foster Care

MONDAY, Jan. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- As the opioid epidemic continues to grip the United States, the toll on the littlest victims -- the children of addicts -- is mounting, new research shows. "There are many...
Apple Investors Press for Parental Controls on iPhones

Apple Investors Press for Parental Controls on iPhones

8 January 2018
MONDAY, Jan. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Parents aren't the only ones worried about their kids' smartphone habits. Some big Apple investors want the iPhone developer to make it easier for Mom and Dad to manage their...
MONDAY, Jan. 8, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Parents aren't the only ones worried about their kids' smartphone habits. Some big Apple investors want the iPhone developer to make it easier for Mom and Dad to manage their children's phone time. Apple also needs to explore potential mental health effects of smartphone overuse, says a letter sent to the technology giant this weekend by Jana Partners LLC and the California State Teachers' Retirement System (Calstrs). Jana, a leading activist investor, and the pension fund control about $2 billion of Apple shares, according to the Wall Street Journal. The letter states that "Apple can play a defining role in signaling to the industry that paying special attention to the health and development of the next generation is both good business and...

Health Tip: Positive Parenting

8 January 2018
(HealthDay News) -- The younger teen years are some of the most emotional, physical and difficult years for adolescents. As hormones change and teens go through puberty, they may be self-conscious about their changing bodies and may worry frequently about what others think. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggests things parents can do to help a young teen: Be honest and direct with your teen when talking about sensitive subjects, such as drugs, drinking, smoking and sex. Get to know your teen's friends. Take interest in your teen's school life. Help your teen make healthy choices while encouraging the teen to make his or her own decisions. Respect your teen's opinions. It's important that the teen knows you are listening. When there is a conflict, be clear...
Exercise Boosts Kids' Brain Health, Too

Exercise Boosts Kids' Brain Health, Too

5 January 2018
FRIDAY, Jan. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A lack of exercise puts kids at risk for very adult problems, like obesity and diabetes. Now there's also research that links exercise to their cognitive development and...
FRIDAY, Jan. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A lack of exercise puts kids at risk for very adult problems, like obesity and diabetes. Now there's also research that links exercise to their cognitive development and achievement in school. Turns out that physical activity gives the young brain needed boosts, according to a study published in Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development. Active children do better in class and on tests because exercise seems to lead to larger brain volumes in areas associated with memory and thinking functions, such as behavior and decision-making. Active kids also appear to have better concentration and longer attention spans -- being fit helps them stay focused to complete assignments, the study authors reported. These findings appear to be...
U.S. Cancer Deaths Steadily Dropping: Report
4 January 2018

U.S. Cancer Deaths Steadily Dropping: Report

THURSDAY, Jan. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Better cancer detection and treatments, not to mention lots of people quitting smoking, have fueled a 20-year drop in deaths from the disease, a new report shows. That means more than 2 million lives have been saved, the American Cancer Society statistics indicate. "It's pretty staggering that 2.4 million deaths have been avoided over the past 20 years," said Dr. Eva Chalas, director of NYU Winthrop's Cancer Center in Mineola, N.Y. "It's exciting to see the numbers coming down. We're making strides, and we have much more to offer people," added Chalas, who was not involved in the study. From 2014 to 2015, the cancer death rate went down 1.7 percent. The decline in cancer death rates began in 1991, and since that time it has dropped by 26...
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