Latest Women's Health News

9Jun
2020

Women Still Left Out of Much Medical Research

Women Still Left Out of Much Medical ResearchTUESDAY, June 9, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Your sex matters when it comes to your health, yet women may still be an afterthought in research studies. Despite policies and grant requirements to include females in research studies, many researchers still don't analyze their data by sex, a new study found. If researchers don't look at their results by sex, it's impossible to know if diseases, drugs or vaccines might impact each sex differently. "Sex influences health and disease in multiple organ systems. It's not just related to the reproductive tract. By not considering by sex in research, it's a harm to women's health," said study author Nicole Woitowich. "We need this information. Right now, we're trying to put a puzzle together and we don't have all the pieces. By including both...

Are Painkillers After Childbirth a Prescription for...

8 June 2020
Are Painkillers After Childbirth a Prescription for Addiction?MONDAY, June 8, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Many women are prescribed opioid painkillers after giving birth, and it may in some cases lead to addiction and overdose, a new study finds. Looking at data on more than 200,000 births in Tennessee, researchers found that nearly all women who had a C-section were prescribed an opioid like oxycodone (OxyContin). The drugs were also prescribed in 59% of vaginal births. Experts said the numbers are surprisingly high, particularly for vaginal deliveries, which can generally be managed with painkillers like ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin). Even more concerning were the consequences: Nearly 4,600 women had what the researchers call a serious opioid-related event -- persistent use of the drug, opioid dependence or an overdose. The findings raise concerns...

Not a Myth -- Contraceptives Can Cause Weight Gain

8 June 2020
Not a Myth -- Contraceptives Can Cause Weight GainMONDAY, June 8, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Genetics may explain why some women gain weight when using a popular method of birth control, researchers say. "For years, women have said that birth control causes them to gain weight but many doctors failed to take them seriously," said lead study author Dr. Aaron Lazorwitz. He's assistant professor of obstetrics/gynecology and family planning at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, in Aurora. "Now we have looked at the genetics and found that the way genes interact with some hormones in birth control could help explain why some women gain more weight than others," Lazorwitz added in a university news release. The etonogestrel contraceptive implant is inserted under the skin. It contains etonogestrel, a kind of progestin that...

AHA News: Pregnant Women With Heart Defects Don't Always...

8 June 2020
AHA News: Pregnant Women With Heart Defects Don`t Always Get This Recommended TestMONDAY, June 8, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- Women with heart defects experience far more cardiovascular problems during pregnancy than those without, yet only half get a recommended test to assess their heart health before giving birth, according to new research. The study, published Monday in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, found that during pregnancy, women with congenital heart disease experienced adverse conditions 34 to 63 times more often than those without heart defects. The conditions included high blood pressure in the lungs, heart rate problems, dangerous heart rhythms and cardiac arrest. But just 56% of these women received the comprehensive echocardiograms experts recommend. "We were surprised that some...

Teens Can Donate Blood, But May Need Iron Supplements After

5 June 2020
Teens Can Donate Blood, But May Need Iron Supplements AfterFRIDAY, June 5, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Teens who donate blood are at significant risk for long-term iron deficiency, a new study warns. The concern comes as 16- to 18-year-olds have emerged as one of the fastest-growing groups of blood donors nationwide. But this study of nearly 31,000 teens who gave blood more than once between 2016 and 2018 found that roughly one in 10 were already iron-deficient when they donated for the first time. And a year later, one-third of the girls and about 15% of the boys still had low iron levels, according to the report published online June 5 in the journal Pediatrics. "Blood loss of any kind is a common cause of iron deficiency in the U.S.," said lead author Dr. Ralph Vassallo. And "blood donation results in the loss of iron-containing red...
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