Latest Women's Health News

10May
2021

Women Get Help Later Than Men When Heart Attack Strikes

Women Get Help Later Than Men When Heart Attack StrikesMONDAY, May 10, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- When young women land in the emergency room with chest pain, they wait longer and get less treatment than their male counterparts, a preliminary study finds.Using a federal survey of U.S. hospitals, researchers found that younger women with chest pain were treated less urgently than men their age. That included a lower likelihood of receiving standard tests for diagnosing a heart attack.Chest pain can have a range of causes, including minor issues like muscle strain and acid reflux.But it's also the most common symptom of heart attack in both women and men, said study co-author Dr. Harmony Reynolds, a cardiologist at NYU Langone Health in New York City.It's not clear why young women were treated differently for their chest pain. But implicit...

Pregnancy Within 1 Year of Weight-Loss Surgery Carries...

10 May 2021
Pregnancy Within 1 Year of Weight-Loss Surgery Carries Added RisksMONDAY, May 10, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Women who get pregnant within a year of having weight-loss surgery are more likely to have preterm and smaller-than-normal babies, a new study suggests.Dutch researchers said their findings support current recommendations to avoid pregnancy for 12 to 24 months after weight-loss (bariatric) surgery."We should encourage women who wish to conceive after bariatric surgery to avoid pregnancy until their weight has stabilized, to minimize the risk of inadequate gestational weight gain," the researchers said.The aim is to head off problems due to ongoing weight loss and an increased risk of malnutrition due to significantly lower calorie intake.The study of 196 women compared three groups -- those who conceived within 12 months of weight-loss surgery...

Could Your Child Have a Heart Defect? Know the Warning Signs

8 May 2021
Could Your Child Have a Heart Defect? Know the Warning SignsSATURDAY, May 8, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Heart defects are often – but not always – detected at birth, so it's important to pay attention when a child gets dizzy, passes out or says her heart is "beeping."These and other warning signs, such as an apparent change in fitness, shouldn't be overlooked, an expert says. Evaluating a child who has these symptoms is important to ensure nothing is missed that could become life-threatening, said Dr. Stephen Cyran, pediatric cardiologist with Penn State Health Children's Heart Group, in Pennsylvania. "Although 80% to 85% of structural heart defects are often caught before or at birth, some don't present themselves until later, so it's important to tell your child's pediatrician or family doctor about any changes you or your child notice,"...

Poll Finds Many Parents Hesitant to Get Younger Kids...

7 May 2021
Poll Finds Many Parents Hesitant to Get Younger Kids VaccinatedFRIDAY, May 7, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- As U.S. health officials prepare to authorize Pfizer's coronavirus vaccine for emergency use in younger children, a new poll shows that less than a third of parents would get their child vaccinated as soon as the shots are approved for kids.Only 29% of parents of children under age 18 said they would get their child vaccinated "right away," according to data published Thursday by Kaiser Family Foundation.Another 32% said they would wait to see how the vaccine is working before getting their child a shot, while the remaining parents said their child would be vaccinated only if their school requires it (15%) or they definitely wouldn't be vaccinated (19%).Public health experts have said that vaccinating children is key to ending the...

Heart Risk Factors Show Up Earlier in U.S. Black Women

6 May 2021
Heart Risk Factors Show Up Earlier in U.S. Black Women THURSDAY, May 6, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Young Black American women have high rates of lifestyle-related risk factors for heart disease, a new study indicates. The findings show the need to help them adopt healthy eating and physical activity habits, as well as make it easier for them to access health care, the researchers said."Young people should be the healthiest members of our population, with normal body weight and normal blood pressure," said study author Dr. Nishant Vatsa, an internal medicine resident at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta. "Diet and exercise play a major role in blood pressure and weight. Primary care providers, prevention-based clinics and community organizations can facilitate interventions proven to mitigate these risk factors," Vatsa said. "Providers...
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