Latest Women's Health News

12Sep
2022

Pandemic Silver Lining: Drop in Infections That Cause Birth Defects

Pandemic Silver Lining: Drop in Infections That Cause Birth DefectsMONDAY, Sept. 12, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The number of babies born with a virus that commonly causes birth defects may have dropped significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic, new research suggests.That was true in Minnesota, the first state to start screening all newborns for congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV).In the five years leading up to the pandemic, about 1 in every 200 babies was born with CMV. That dropped to 1 in every 1,000 between August 2020 and December 2021, the new study found."At last, something positive came out of the COVID-19 pandemic," said principal investigator Dr. Mark Schleiss. He's a pediatric infectious disease specialist and professor at the University of Minnesota Medical School. "The hygienic precautions we all have engaged in during the pandemic --...

Screening Test Leads to Fewer Women Included in Autism...

12 September 2022
Screening Test Leads to Fewer Women Included in Autism StudiesMONDAY, Sept. 12, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- A frequently used screening test for autism creates a gender gap that could hinder diagnosis and treatment for women and girls, a new study suggests.Researchers who study autism have been working to include more women and girls in their studies in recent years. Still, the majority of these studies consistently include few or no female participants, the report authors said.Why? They found that a screening test often used to decide who can take part in autism studies seems to exclude a much higher percentage of women than men. "I think the findings favor having a more inclusive approach and widening the lens to end up being less biased in terms of who participates in research," said senior study author John Gabrieli. He's a professor of brain...

Talking to Your Child About Weight, But Avoiding Stigma

11 September 2022
Talking to Your Child About Weight, But Avoiding StigmaSUNDAY, Sept. 11, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Helping a child deal with a weight issue, while avoiding negativity about their body image, can be challenging, one expert says.Yet, obesity affects 20% of American children, causing harm to physical and mental health.Dr. Marsha Novick, medical director of the Healthy Weight Program for Children and Teens at Penn State Health Children’s Hospital, in Hershey, Pa., offered some suggestions for parents helping their child maintain a healthy weight.“Parents should see obesity as a health or medical problem, rather than a willpower issue,” Novick said in a hospital news release. “Obesity is not their child’s fault — readily available ultra-processed foods are the problem. The reward centers in the human brain are stimulated by processed...

FDA Warns of Rare Cases of Certain Cancers Linked to...

9 September 2022
FDA Warns of Rare Cases of Certain Cancers Linked to Breast ImplantsFRIDAY, Sept. 9, 2022 (HealthDay News) – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday warned doctors and their patients about rare cases of squamous cell carcinoma and various lymphomas developing in the scar tissue that forms around breast implants. These cancers are different than an earlier FDA warning about Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (BIA-ALCL).Federal regulators discovered reports of the cancers as part of its routine post-market review and cautioned that their understanding of what’s going on is still evolving. So far, cases are rare: There have been fewer than 20 cases of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and fewer than 30 cases of various lymphomas reported in the capsule around breast implants, the FDA said. “While the FDA believes that...

Getting Kids Walking, Biking to School Can Lead to Long-Term Fitness

9 September 2022
Getting Kids Walking, Biking to School Can Lead to Long-Term FitnessFRIDAY, Sept. 9, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Kids who walk, skateboard or ride their bikes to school when they are young are more likely to keep it up as they get older, reaping the health benefits, recent research suggests.“The walk to school is a wonderful moment in the day that provides children a glimpse of living an active lifestyle,” said study co-author David Tulloch, a professor of landscape architecture at Rutgers University-New Brunswick in New Jersey. “When people start walking early, it can have a lasting impact on their health.”About 11% of kids in the United States walk or ride their bikes to or from school, according to the National Household Travel Survey. This rate hasn't changed in a decade.In the study, the researchers found that kids are much more likely to...
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