Latest Women's Health News

9Sep
2022

Hunger, Poor Diet More Likely for Women With Disabilities

Hunger, Poor Diet More Likely for Women With DisabilitiesFRIDAY, Sept. 9, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers working to better understand the diets of younger women with disabilities found this group was more likely to report a poor diet and food insecurity."Eating a nutritious diet is central to preventing many chronic diseases. For women of reproductive age, a healthy diet can also support good outcomes during and after pregnancy," said study author Andrea Deierlein, an associate professor of public health nutrition at New York University's School of Global Public Health. "But a healthy diet requires access to healthy foods and the resources or ability to prepare them, and women with disabilities may face obstacles due to medical conditions or physical limitations," she said in a university news release.The researchers analyzed data from...

Feds Tighten Safety Standards on Tiny High-Powered...

8 September 2022
Feds Tighten Safety Standards on Tiny High-Powered Magnets That Have Injured KidsTHURSDAY, Sept. 8, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- New federal safety standards announced Wednesday aim to keep kids and teens safe from serious or life-threatening injuries from accidental swallowing of high-powered magnets.The new standards require that certain products with loose or separable magnets contain only those that are weak or too large to swallow. The aim is to reduce injuries that can occur when swallowed magnets attract to each other inside the body. The risks include perforations, twisting and/or blockage of the intestines, infection, blood poisoning and even death.Under the new standards, magnets that fit in a small parts cylinder must have a flux index of less than 50 kG2 mm2. Flux index is a measure of magnetic strength.The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC)...

Too Little Exercise, Too Much Sitting Could Raise Breast...

8 September 2022
Too Little Exercise, Too Much Sitting Could Raise Breast Cancer RiskTHURSDAY, Sept. 8, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Sitting on the couch or behind a desk could be increasing your risk of breast cancer, a new genetics-driven study suggests.People more likely to engage in physical activity based on their DNA had a 41% lower risk of invasive breast cancer, researchers report.Previous research also has shown a link between exercise and reduced cancer risk, but “our study suggests that the strength of the relationship may be even stronger than suggested by observational studies,” said senior researcher Brigid Lynch, deputy head of cancer epidemiology for Cancer Council Victoria, in Melbourne, Australia.“Our study also suggests that sedentary behavior may increase the risk of breast cancer,” Lynch continued. “The risk increase is greater for...

Dirty Air Could Raise COVID Risks for Poor Pregnant Women

8 September 2022
Dirty Air Could Raise COVID Risks for Poor Pregnant WomenTHURSDAY, Sept. 8, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- While exposure to smog is a known risk factor for preterm birth and low-birth weight, new research suggests it also may heighten risk of COVID-19 infection for pregnant low-income women.Scientists at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health analyzed the COVID test results for more than 3,300 pregnant women in New York and also assessed their long-term exposure to fine particulate matter known as PM2.5.They found that poorer women in neighborhoods with higher levels of PM2.5 air pollution were 60% more likely to test positive for COVID-19. "COVID-19 has exposed and exacerbated existing health disparities. Low-income pregnant people may have been more likely to test positive for the virus and be symptomatic due to more exposure on...

Taking 2 Supplements in Pregnancy Could Lower Baby's Odds for Croup

7 September 2022
Taking 2 Supplements in Pregnancy Could Lower Baby`s Odds for CroupWEDNESDAY, Sept. 7, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Many new parents have been jarred awake in the dead of night when they hear their baby let out that telltale barky cough that signals a bout of croup.Until now, nothing was thought to stave off the disease in babies who are prone to it, but a new study has discovered that when women took high doses of fish oil and vitamin D supplements during pregnancy, their babies had around a 40% lower risk of developing croup.Croup is a viral chest infection that mainly strikes kids under the age of 3. Symptoms include a barking seal-like cough, a hoarse voice, and a high-pitched, squeaky noise while breathing. Croup is usually mild, but some children will need more intensive treatment."There is currently no vaccine against the pathogen that causes this...
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