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22Jan
2020

'Yo-Yo' Blood Pressure Numbers in Youth a Bad Sign for Health Later

`Yo-Yo` Blood Pressure Numbers in Youth a Bad Sign for Health LaterWEDNESDAY, Jan. 22, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- If your blood pressure numbers swing from low to high and back again in your 20s, that could bode ill for heart health in middle age, new research shows. In fact, every 4 mm Hg spike in systolic blood pressure -- the top number in a reading -- during young adulthood was tied to a 15% higher risk for heart disease in midlife, the research team found. Study lead author Dr. Yuichiro Yano believes the findings have implications for how routine blood pressure checks are interpreted by doctors. "If a patient comes in with one reading in December and a significantly lower reading in January, the average might be within the range that would appear normal," said Yano, an assistant professor of family medicine at Duke University in Durham, N.C....

Are Antibiotics a Recipe for Obesity in Childhood?

22 January 2020
Are Antibiotics a Recipe for Obesity in Childhood?WEDNESDAY, Jan. 22, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Children who receive multiple antibiotic prescriptions early in life may be vulnerable to obesity, two new studies suggest. In one study, researchers found that 4-year-olds who'd received more than nine antibiotic prescriptions in their lives were twice as likely to be obese as their peers with no antibiotic exposure. The second study found a similar pattern. However, the antibiotic-obesity link disappeared when the researchers compared siblings with one another -- suggesting that some other factors within families might explain the finding instead. For now, experts said, it's unclear whether antibiotic use directly affects children's weight. But the studies underscore the long-established need for more judicious use of...

Vaping Is the Darling of Instagram

22 January 2020
Vaping Is the Darling of InstagramWEDNESDAY, Jan. 22, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Vaping has been deemed hazardous for your health by public officials across America, but you wouldn't know it by scrolling through Instagram. Instead, researchers discovered that Instagram posts that promote use of the devices outnumber anti-vaping content by a shocking ratio of 10,000 to 1. Nearly one-third of U.S. teens use e-cigarettes. In 2018, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration launched a campaign to discourage vaping among youth, according to authors of the study published Jan. 22 in the journal Frontiers in Communication. "U.S. public health officials have been calling vaping among youth an epidemic and have been putting a lot of effort into trying to stop this epidemic by introducing #TheRealCost anti-vaping campaign," said...

Super-Cooled Injections Might Ice Away 'Deep Fat'

22 January 2020
Super-Cooled Injections Might Ice Away `Deep Fat`WEDNESDAY, Jan. 22, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The Harvard-associated lab that created the "CoolSculpting" process of reducing fat says it's on the trail of the next advance in nonsurgical slimming. CoolSculpting freezes fat cells by applying an ice-cold gel pad to the skin, causing cells to die off and either be flushed away or absorbed by the body, said lead researcher Dr. Lilit Garibyan, an investigator at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Now her lab is trying to make that process even more effective by injecting an icy liquid slurry directly into fat deposits. In tests with pigs, the injectable slurry containing 20% to 40% ice caused fat deposits to melt away over several weeks, researchers reported recently in the journal Plastic and...

This Year's Flu Season Taking Deadly Aim at Kids

22 January 2020
This Year`s Flu Season Taking Deadly Aim at KidsWEDNESDAY, Jan. 22, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- How bad or how long this year's flu season will be remains to be seen. But one thing is already clear: It's proving to be an especially lethal season for infected children. Fueled by a strain of influenza that children may be especially vulnerable to, less than two months into flu season 39 children have already died, according to data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Behind that number lie tragedies like these: Just after New Year's Day, flu claimed the life of 15-year-old Lacie Rian Fisher of Canton, N.C. Fisher was a healthy, athletic teen with no known pre-existing medical issues, but she had not yet been inoculated with this year's flu vaccine, USA Today reported. She died just three days after first feeling...

Flame Retardants, Pesticides Remain Threat to U.S. Health: Study

21 January 2020
Flame Retardants, Pesticides Remain Threat to U.S. Health: StudyTUESDAY, Jan. 21, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- While health problems from childhood exposure to lead and mercury are on the decline, these and other toxic chemicals continue to take a toll, a new study reports. The progress likely owes to decades of restrictions on use of heavy metals. But researchers from NYU Grossman School of Medicine in New York City said that exposure to other toxic chemicals -- especially flame retardants and pesticides -- led to more than 1 million cases of intellectual disability in the United States between 2001 and 2016. Unlike the heavily restricted metals, toxic chemicals are subject to fewer limits, the researchers noted. "Our findings suggest that our efforts to reduce exposure to heavy metals are paying off, but that toxic exposures in general continue...

For Cancer Survivors, Financial Hardship Is Common: Survey

21 January 2020
For Cancer Survivors, Financial Hardship Is Common: SurveyTUESDAY, Jan. 21, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Many American cancer survivors struggle to pay for their medical care and have to cut back on spending, dip into their savings, or change their living situation. These problems are more common among those under 65 than among older survivors, a new survey reveals. Researchers focused on 401 cancer survivors, ages 18 to 64, and 562 who were 65 and older. Among the younger group, 54% had medical financial hardship as a result of their cancer diagnosis and treatment. The same percentage had made financial sacrifices in spending, savings or their living arrangements as a result. Nearly a quarter of these younger respondents said they had trouble paying medical bills, needed to borrow money, or filed for bankruptcy. More than 40% were worried...

Using Pot to Help With Sleep? Benefits May Not Last

21 January 2020
Using Pot to Help With Sleep? Benefits May Not LastTUESDAY, Jan. 21, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Medical marijuana may not provide long-term relief of sleep issues in people battling chronic pain, a new study finds, mainly because users may develop a tolerance to the drug. The finding is important "considering the aging of the population, the relatively high prevalence of sleep problems in this population, along with the increasing use of medicinal cannabis," said an Israeli team led by Sharon Sznitman, from the School of Public Health at the University of Haifa. According to the study authors, chronic pain affects between 19% to 37% of adults in the developed world, many who have sleep problems. Some are turning to medical marijuana for help getting good shut-eye. But how well does it work? To find out, Sznitman's group assessed...

First U.S. Patient With China Coronavirus Is Diagnosed...

TUESDAY, Jan. 21, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The first U.S. case of a new coronavirus illness that originated in central China has been identified in a patient in Washington State, federal health...

Brain Waves Offer Insight Into Sleep Struggles That...

TUESDAY, Jan. 21, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Shallower-than-normal brain waves may play a role in serious sleep problems in children with autism, a new study suggests. Previous research has shown...
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