Latest Adolescent Health News

Your Personality as a Teen May Predict Your Risk of Dementia: Study 17Oct
2019

Your Personality as a Teen May Predict Your Risk of Dementia: Study

THURSDAY, Oct. 17, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Could your personality as a teen forecast your risk for dementia a half-century later? Very possibly, say researchers, who found that dementia risk is lower among seniors...
Brain Damage From Concussion Evident a Year Later

Brain Damage From Concussion Evident a Year Later

16 October 2019
WEDNESDAY, Oct. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Concussion damage may linger a full year after an athlete returns to play, Canadian researchers report. "Brain recovery after concussion may be a more complex and...
WEDNESDAY, Oct. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Concussion damage may linger a full year after an athlete returns to play, Canadian researchers report. "Brain recovery after concussion may be a more complex and longer-lasting process than we originally thought," said lead investigator Nathan Churchill, a research associate in the Neuroscience Research Program at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto. After a concussion, he said doctors usually clear athletes for play when symptoms disappear. But this new study, which relied on a series of MRI scans, suggests subtle brain damage may persist even when symptoms like headaches and concentration problems improve. "These findings raise questions about when, if ever, the brain returns to normal, and if these brain changes translate into a worse...
Shrinking Youth Group Aids Global Decline in Homicides

Shrinking Youth Group Aids Global Decline in Homicides

15 October 2019
TUESDAY, Oct. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Aging populations in many countries may explain why the worldwide homicide rate fell 20% between 1990 and 2015, researchers say. They analyzed data from 126 countries that...
TUESDAY, Oct. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Aging populations in many countries may explain why the worldwide homicide rate fell 20% between 1990 and 2015, researchers say. They analyzed data from 126 countries that account for 90% of the world's population and found that people aged 15 to 29 were responsible for a large percentage of homicides. However, that age group is shrinking and now accounts for just 21% of the global population. The decline in the size of that age group is strongly associated with falling homicide rates, according to the study, published Oct. 9 in the journal PLoS One. The largest declines in homicides were in regions with lower crime rates. North America and Western Europe had a 40% decrease in homicides between 1990 and 2015, Asia had a 37.5% decline,...
Farm-to-Table Movement Goes to School

Farm-to-Table Movement Goes to School

11 October 2019
FRIDAY, Oct. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's a healthy new twist in the farm-to-table movement: Getting farm-fresh food to school lunchrooms and even having students grow their own crops as part of...
FRIDAY, Oct. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- There's a healthy new twist in the farm-to-table movement: Getting farm-fresh food to school lunchrooms and even having students grow their own crops as part of learning. Colorado was a pioneer in passing the "Farm-to-School Healthy Kids Act" in 2010. The move was designed to increase the use of local farm and ranch products in school food service programs to both improve childhood nutrition and strengthen the state's agricultural economy. Today, a handful of other states have similar programs. Some schools also have added programs for growing food to their curriculum. An example is in place at Community School 55 in New York's South Bronx, thanks to the Green Bronx Machine. Educator Stephen Ritz founded the nonprofit as an after-school...
New Finding Challenges Old Notions About Dyslexia
10 October 2019

New Finding Challenges Old Notions About Dyslexia

THURSDAY, Oct. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The cerebellum does not affect reading ability in people with dyslexia, according to a new study that challenges a controversial theory. The cerebellum is a brain structure traditionally involved in motor function. Some researchers have suggested in the past that it plays a role in dyslexia-related reading problems. This new study disputes that theory and could lead to improved treatment of dyslexia, according to scientists from Georgetown University Medical Center in Washington, D.C. "Prior imaging research on reading in dyslexia had not found much support for this theory … but these studies tended to focus on the cortex," explained study first author Sikoya Ashburn, a Ph.D. candidate in neuroscience. "Therefore, we tackled the question...
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