Latest Adolescent Health News

23Jan
2021

Child Car Seat Safety Tip: Skip Puffy Winter Coats

Child Car Seat Safety Tip: Skip Puffy Winter CoatsSATURDAY, Jan. 23, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Puffy coats have their place, but it's not inside a car seat.The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) offers a variety of tips for keeping your little ones safe and warm while traveling by car.The first is to avoid dressing children in puffy coats or snowsuits before buckling them in, because car seat straps won't tighten enough. That creates a danger that the fluffy padding will flatten in the force of a crash and the youngster will slip from the seat and be thrown from the car. Puffy coats are not safe in a car seat or under a seat belt for someone of any age, the AAP said."Parents may not recognize the potential danger of buckling up a child who is wearing a puffy coat," said Dr. Sarah Denny, a pediatrician with expertise in injury...

UK Prime Minister Says British COVID Variant May Be More...

22 January 2021
UK Prime Minister Says British COVID Variant May Be More DeadlyFRIDAY, Jan. 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- British Prime Minister Boris Johnson warned on Friday that a new, more infectious coronavirus variant first spotted in the United Kingdom late last year could also be more lethal.The new variant, which has since been found in numerous countries including the United States, was already known to be far more infectious than the original coronavirus. Some studies have suggested it is 50% to 70% more transmissible, the Washington Post reported.But to make matters worse, Johnson and his advisers suggested during a media briefing that the new variant may kill more people who are infected with it."In addition to spreading more quickly, it also now appears that there is some evidence that the new variant -- the variant that was first identified in...

For Maximum Effectiveness, De-Stress and Get Healthy...

22 January 2021
For Maximum Effectiveness, De-Stress and Get Healthy Before Your COVID ShotFRIDAY, Jan. 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Not many people have had the opportunity to get the COVID-19 vaccine yet.But while you wait your turn, there are some steps you can take to give the vaccine — whichever brand you get — a boost when it's available to you.An Ohio State University review of 49 vaccine studies dating back 30 years examined how stress, depression and healthy behaviors, such as exercise, can affect immune response to a vaccine.Although it's not realistic to entirely transform your health and habits in a few weeks or months, there are some steps everyone can take — even last-minute ones — to make a difference.Those include getting good sleep as well as exercise in the days before and after you get your shot, said the review's senior author, Janice...

Biden Warns of 500,000 COVID Deaths by February

22 January 2021
Biden Warns of 500,000 COVID Deaths by FebruaryFRIDAY, Jan. 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- As President Joe Biden began to enact key parts of his ambitious pandemic response plan on Thursday, he warned Americans that the coronavirus death toll in this country could top 500,000 by February."Let me be very clear: Things are going to continue to get worse before they get better," Biden said. "And let me be equally clear: We will get through this. We will defeat this pandemic."He tackled mask-wearing first, signing an order mandating masks in airports and on many planes, trains, ships and intercity buses, the Washington Post reported. The move follows the Wednesday signing of his first executive order, which requires masks on federal property.That is as close to a national mask mandate as Biden's federal powers allow, leaving it to...

Immune System May 'Remember' Infections From Previous Coronaviruses

22 January 2021
Immune System May `Remember` Infections From Previous Coronaviruses FRIDAY, Jan. 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Previous coronavirus infections might prime the immune system to fight the new coronavirus that causes COVID-19, a new study suggests. There are numerous types of coronaviruses, including many harmless ones that cause mild upper respiratory infections similar to the common cold. Besides SARS-CoV-2 -- the virus that causes COVID-19 -- other deadly coronaviruses include MERS-CoV, which caused a 2012 outbreak in Saudi Arabia of Middle East respiratory syndrome, and SARS-CoV-1, the first pandemic coronavirus that caused the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak. The authors of the new study investigated how coronaviruses affect the human immune system and also took a closer look at the workings of the antibody response. "Our...
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