Latest Adolescent Health News

7Aug
2020

As in Adults, Minority Kids Hit Hardest by COVID-19

As in Adults, Minority Kids Hit Hardest by COVID-19FRIDAY, Aug. 7, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. minorities have been particularly hard-hit by the coronavirus pandemic, and a new study suggests kids are no exception. Researchers found that at one community testing site, nearly half of Hispanic children and teens were positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The same was true of 30% of Black kids. The rate among white kids hovered around 7%. At this point, racial disparities in the U.S. pandemic are well-documented -- at least among adults. "But those adults also live with children," said lead researcher Dr. Monika Goyal. Her team's findings -- published online Aug. 5 in Pediatrics -- offer a glimpse at how the pandemic is disproportionately affecting kids and teens, as well. What the study cannot discern is why,...

Will Your Kid Play School Sports This Fall? Here's Some...

6 August 2020
Will Your Kid Play School Sports This Fall? Here`s Some Guidance on Doing It SafelyTHURSDAY, Aug. 6, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- If you're thinking about letting your child resume sports while the coronavirus pandemic continues to rage, a leading pediatricians' group says there are a few things you should consider. To help families make informed decisions, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recently released guidance based on the most current research. "We recommend that parents talk to their pediatrician about the type of sport and setting, local disease activity, and individual circumstances, such as an underlying health condition that places the athlete or family members at high risk," Dr. Susannah Briskin, one of the guidance authors, said in an AAP news release. "The risk can be decreased, but not eliminated, by athletes, parents, coaches and officials who...

Skip the 'Maskne,' Not the Mask

5 August 2020
Skip the `Maskne,` Not the MaskWEDNESDAY, Aug. 5, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- For most people, wearing a face mask is a harmless inconvenience, but wearing the coverings may cause skin problems for some, one dermatologist explains. It's been called mask-acne, or "maskne." Dermatologist Dr. Allison Truong, from Cedars-Sinai Medical Group in Los Angeles, said that she is seeing many patients with this problem. Patients are complaining of three types of skin issues: Acne from clogged pores inside the mask area. Skin irritation from the mask. Allergic reactions to detergent used to wash a fabric mask or dyes or other substances in surgical masks. If your skin is red, burning or itchy, it may be an irritation or allergy. If there are little pustules or blackheads or whiteheads, it's most likely maskne, Truong...

Mysterious Paralyzing Illness in Kids Is Set to Return,...

4 August 2020
Mysterious Paralyzing Illness in Kids Is Set to Return, CDC WarnsTUESDAY, Aug. 4, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- A new outbreak of a mysterious, potentially fatal polio-like illness could strike hundreds of American children within the next few months, U.S. health officials warned Tuesday. Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) outbreaks have occurred every two years in the United States since 2014, peaking between August and November, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. More than 9 of 10 cases occur in children. More than half of AFM cases wind up in intensive care, and nearly 1 in 4 require a ventilator to survive after their muscles grow too weak to adequately draw breath, according to a review of the 2018 outbreak published Aug. 4 in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. "AFM is a medical emergency that requires immediate...

Brush With Common Cold Might Help Protect Against COVID-19

4 August 2020
Brush With Common Cold Might Help Protect Against COVID-19TUESDAY, Aug. 4, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Since the pandemic began, it's been known that the severity of coronavirus illness varies widely between people. Could the common cold be the reason why? It's still just a theory, but researchers in California suspect that if you've recently had a cold -- many of which are also caused by coronaviruses -- your immune system's T-cells might recognize SARS-CoV-2 and help fight it. "We have now proven that in some people, preexisting T-cell memory against common cold coronaviruses can cross-recognize SARS-CoV-2, down to exact molecular structures," said study co-lead author Daniela Weiskopf, an assistant professor at the La Jolla Institute for Immunology. "This could help explain why some people show milder symptoms of disease while others get...
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