Latest Adolescent Health News

26Jan
2023

Siblings of Babies Who Died of SIDS May Also Face Higher Risk

Siblings of Babies Who Died of SIDS May Also Face Higher RiskTHURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have long struggled to figure out what causes a seemingly healthy baby to die suddenly in the first year of life, with an array of possible genetic and environmental factors to choose from.Now a large, Danish study has found that in families where one child has succumbed to sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), a younger sibling’s risk appears to quadruple.“I am not very surprised by these findings,” said Dr. Michael Goodstein, a member of the American Academy of Pediatrics Task Force on SIDS, who reviewed the study.Goodstein, division chief of newborn medicine with WellSpan Health in York, Pa., noted that “other studies, including ones in the U.S. and the U.K., have shown a small but real increase in the risk of SIDS for...

Top FDA Official Involved in Baby Formula Debacle Resigns

26 January 2023
Top FDA Official Involved in Baby Formula Debacle ResignsTHURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- A U.S. Food and Drug Administration official who has led the agency’s food policy efforts since 2018 announced his resignation on Wednesday.Frank Yiannas was also among the top officials leading the agency response to last year’s infant formula shortage."Today, I informed [FDA] Commissioner [Robert] Califf that I will be resigning my position as Deputy Commissioner for the Office of Food Policy and Response, effective February 24. I am honored to have served the American public, alongside each and every one of you, over these past four years," Yiannas tweeted.In his resignation letter, Yiannas noted he inherited a "decentralized structure" at the foods program and said it "significantly impaired FDA’s ability to operate as an...

Childhood Autism Diagnosis Is Getting Better, But Not...

26 January 2023
Childhood Autism Diagnosis Is Getting Better, But Not for EveryoneTHURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Autism cases are surging in the New York-New Jersey metro area, mainly fueled by the diagnosis of autistic children who don’t have intellectual disabilities, a new study reports. The percentage of kids identified with autism spectrum disorder rose from about 1% in 2000 to 3% in 2016 in that region, said lead researcher Josephine Shenouda, program manager and epidemiologist with the Rutgers University Children’s Research Center in New Jersey.That increase occurred mainly due to new diagnoses of autistic children with a borderline, average or above-average IQ, according to findings published Jan. 26 in the journal Pediatrics.“The driver of the increase of autism was really coming from identification of children with autism without...

Updated Boosters Cut Risk of XBB Variant Infection by...

26 January 2023
Updated Boosters Cut Risk of XBB Variant Infection by Nearly HalfTHURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- In a finding that suggests the updated bivalent COVID booster shots are worth getting, new government data shows they cut the chances of infection with the new XBB variant by nearly half.While those ages 49 and under saw a 48% reduction in risk, the shots were slightly less effective in older individuals -- about 40% in adults ages 50 to 64 and 43% in those 65 and up. Effectiveness was seen for both the Pfizer and Moderna boosters, the study from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found.While the boosters were modified last summer to target the Omicron subvariants BA.4 and BA.5, the latest research reveals they’re also working against XBB, which is now responsible for about half of new cases in the United States.This is...

Mom's Exposure to Dirty Air in Pregnancy Could Harm a Toddler's Development

26 January 2023
Mom`s Exposure to Dirty Air in Pregnancy Could Harm a Toddler`s DevelopmentTHURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- A mother-to-be's exposure to air pollution during pregnancy may have a lasting impact on her baby's brain development, new research indicates.Toddlers scored lower on assessments for thinking, motor and language skills when their mothers had more exposure to pollutants during pregnancy, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder.“Our findings suggest that pollution exposure, particularly during mid-to-late pregnancy, may negatively impact neurodevelopment in early life,” co-author Tanya Alderete, an assistant professor of integrative physiology, said in a university news release.To study this, the researchers followed 161 healthy, Hispanic mother-infant pairs who lived in Southern California and were enrolled in the...
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