Latest Adolescent Health News

28Sep
2020

1 in 3 U.S. Parents Won't Get Flu Shots for Their Kids: Survey

1 in 3 U.S. Parents Won`t Get Flu Shots for Their Kids: SurveyMONDAY, Sept. 28, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The coronavirus pandemic and the upcoming flu season could pose a double threat, but many U.S. parents plan to skip flu shots for their kids, a new survey finds. Though public health experts stress the need for people of all ages to get the seasonal flu vaccine during the COVID-19 pandemic, 1 in 3 U.S. parents said they don't plan on taking their child for a flu shot this fall. Just a third think having their child get vaccinated is more important than usual this year. Common reasons cited include unfounded concerns about side effects or mistaken beliefs that a flu shot isn't necessary or effective. Those are among the findings from the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health at Michigan Medicine. It was conducted...

For Kids With Hearing Issues, Early Intervention Crucial...

28 September 2020
For Kids With Hearing Issues, Early Intervention Crucial to School ReadinessMONDAY, Sept. 28, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- When babies with hearing impairments get help very early in life, they are more likely to be "kindergarten-ready" when the time comes, a new study finds. In the United States, all states have government-funded "early intervention" programs designed to assist parents whose babies are deaf or hard of hearing. Ideally, that intervention starts soon after hearing issues are diagnosed, as early in life as possible. Researchers have found that when babies are enrolled in the programs before they are 6 months old, it aids their language development. The new study suggests it also better prepares them for kindergarten. In fact, those children were as likely to show "kindergarten readiness" as youngsters with no hearing problems, according to the...

Small Risk of Autism Seen in Babies Born Preterm and...

25 September 2020
Small Risk of Autism Seen in Babies Born Preterm and Post-TermFRIDAY, Sept. 25, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- There may be a slightly increased risk of autism for each week a child is born before or after 40 weeks of gestation, according to a new study. Researchers are still trying to pinpoint the causes of autism, but both genetic and environmental factors are believed to play a role. Some previous studies have suggested that being born before or after full term (40 weeks) may be associated with an increased risk of autism. But many of those studies were limited in scope and didn't account for sex and birth weight. In this study, researchers analyzed data on more than 3.5 million children born in Sweden, Finland and Norway between 1995 and 2015. Of those, 1.44% were diagnosed with autism, and 4.7% were born preterm (before 37 weeks of...

Low Vitamin D Levels Tied to Higher Odds for Severe COVID

25 September 2020
Low Vitamin D Levels Tied to Higher Odds for Severe COVIDFRIDAY, Sept. 25, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Low blood levels of vitamin D might heighten people's odds for severe or even fatal COVID-19, new research shows. Taking in a healthy level of vitamin D may therefore "reduce the complications, including the cytokine storm [release of too many proteins into the blood too quickly] and ultimately death from COVID-19," said study author Dr. Michael Holick. He's a professor of medicine, physiology, biophysics and molecular medicine at Boston University School of Medicine. Vitamin D is called the "sunshine vitamin" because it's manufactured naturally by the skin upon contact with sunlight. But it can also be sourced through certain foods and supplements. One respiratory health expert who wasn't involved in the study said the findings echo those...

Kids Much Less Prone to Coronavirus Infection Than Adults: Study

25 September 2020
Kids Much Less Prone to Coronavirus Infection Than Adults: StudyFRIDAY, Sept. 25, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Combined data from 32 studies from around the world suggest that children under the age of 10 are much less likely to become infected with SARS-CoV-2 compared with adults, given the same daily contacts. Children's risk appears to rise with age: Among adolescent and older teenagers, the risk of infection begins to approach that of adults, according to British researchers led by Russell Viner, of the Institute of Child Health at University College London. Overall, "children and adolescents younger than 20 years had 44% lower odds of secondary infection with SARS-CoV-2 compared with adults 20 years and older," the researchers reported Sept. 25 in JAMA Pediatrics. Most of the reduction in infection risk was concentrated in kids under the age...
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