Latest Adolescent Health News

25Sep
2020

Conspiracy Theories Are Helping Fuel Rejection of Masks, Vaccines

Conspiracy Theories Are Helping Fuel Rejection of Masks, VaccinesFRIDAY, Sept. 25, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- People who buy into conspiracy theories about COVID-19 may be especially likely to refuse a vaccine when one becomes available, a new study suggests. Researchers said the results are not surprising. But they highlight how mistrust in authorities could already be undermining efforts to get the pandemic under control: Those same conspiracy believers were also less likely to regularly wear a face mask in public. The study, which surveyed 840 U.S. adults in March and July, found that many believed at least one pandemic conspiracy theory: By July, 37% believed the Chinese government had created the new coronavirus as a biological weapon. Meanwhile, others suspected the pharmaceutical industry engineered the virus, and one-third believed U.S....

FDA Warns of Danger From 'Benadryl Challenge,' Asks...

24 September 2020
FDA Warns of Danger From `Benadryl Challenge,`  Asks TikTok to Remove VideosTHURSDAY, Sept. 24, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Parents and other caregivers need to be more aware of the potentially lethal "Benadryl Challenge" circulating on social media, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Thursday. The new internet dare, broadcast widely on teen-friendly TikTok, urges kids to overdose on the over-the-counter antihistamine Benadryl to achieve a hallucinatory state. However, attempts to do so can quickly prove tragic, warned the FDA. Alarmed by reports of severe or even fatal pediatric illnesses tied to the prank, the agency said it has "contacted TikTok and strongly urged them to remove the videos from their platform." Overdosing on the drug, medically known as diphenhydramine, can result in "serious heart problems, seizures, coma, or even death," the...

Parent's Skin-to-Skin Hug Does Ease a Baby's Pain, Brain...

24 September 2020
Parent`s Skin-to-Skin Hug Does Ease a Baby`s Pain, Brain Study SuggestsTHURSDAY, Sept. 24, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Infants may feel less pain when held by a parent with skin-to-skin contact, a new U.K. study suggests. "We have found when a baby is held by their parent with skin-on-skin contact, the higher-level brain processing in response to pain is somewhat dampened. The baby's brain is also using a different pathway to process its response to pain," said study co-author Lorenzo Fabrizi. He's with University College London in the department of neuroscience, physiology and pharmacology. "While we cannot confirm whether the baby actually feels less pain, our findings reinforce the important role of touch between parents and their newborn babies," Fabrizi said in a college news release. The study included 27 infants, up to about 3 months old, who were...

After COVID-19 Exposure, When Can Young Athletes Resume...

24 September 2020
After COVID-19 Exposure, When Can Young Athletes Resume Play?THURSDAY, Sept. 24, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Young athletes who've had moderate COVID-19 symptoms should be symptom-free for 14 days and get their doctor's OK before returning to practices or games, according to a leading group of U.S. pediatricians. An electrocardiogram (EKG) is also recommended for those who've had moderate COVID-19 symptoms, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) said in updated guidance. "Exercise and sports offer so many health benefits to youth, and we know that many are eager to return to play," Dr. Susannah Briskin, an author of the guidance, said in an AAP news release. "We have many suggestions on how to reduce the risks, and they require being candid and forthcoming about anyone who is feeling unwell. Parents, children and coaches need to make safety...

Kids Who Need Steroids Face Risk of Diabetes, Other Ills

24 September 2020
Kids Who Need Steroids Face Risk of Diabetes, Other IllsTHURSDAY, Sept. 24, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Children who need to take oral steroids for chronic or life-threatening conditions can experience serious side effects, according to new research. Children with autoimmune disorders such as juvenile arthritis, psoriasis or inflammatory bowel disease are often prescribed a steroid to keep the illness under control. But the odds that a child might develop diabetes was nearly six times higher in children taking steroids than in those who don't. The odds of high blood pressure was 19 times higher in those on steroids, and the likelihood of a blood clot was 16 times higher, the study found. The good news, however, is that these complications are all exceedingly rare. "These complications are serious but rare. They affect a very tiny...
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