Latest Adolescent Health News

Can't Pay the Rent? Kids' Health May Suffer 22Jan
2018

Can't Pay the Rent? Kids' Health May Suffer

MONDAY, Jan. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of American families struggle to find and keep stable housing -- and the fight to do so may end up harming kids' health. Researchers found that when families faced...
Opioid Epidemic Also Taking Toll on Babies

Opioid Epidemic Also Taking Toll on Babies

22 January 2018
MONDAY, Jan. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In yet another example of how far-reaching the fallout from America's opioid epidemic is, researchers report that babies exposed to these narcotics while in the womb run the...
MONDAY, Jan. 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- In yet another example of how far-reaching the fallout from America's opioid epidemic is, researchers report that babies exposed to these narcotics while in the womb run the risk of certain head and neck abnormalities. One is a twisting of the neck (torticollis) and the other is a flattening of the head (plagiocephaly), which often occurs in tandem with torticollis. In the study, doctors at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center looked at 783 infants born over five years, and found that 87 (11 percent) of those exposed to opioids in the womb were diagnosed with torticollis. In 1994, the rate of torticollis in the general population was 0.3 percent to 1.9 percent, the study authors noted. "Awareness of these potential issues in this...

Health Tip: Control Impetigo

22 January 2018
(HealthDay News) -- Impetigo is a common childhood disease that is usually treated with an antibiotic, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says. The skin infection typically produces blisters and sores in young children, most often around the nose and mouth, neck, hands and diaper area. The highly contagious disease is caused by the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. It typically infects children aged 2 to 6 during the winter months. The FDA suggests how to prevent the spread of impetigo: Clean the infected areas with soap and water. Cover the scabs and sores loosely until they heal. Remove crusty scabs gently. Wash your hands with soap and water after touching the infected area. Avoid touching things that someone with impetigo has used, such as utensils,...
Why Evenings May Be a Dangerous Time for Dieters

Why Evenings May Be a Dangerous Time for Dieters

19 January 2018
FRIDAY, Jan. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The hours after sunset may be toughest for folks trying to stay slim, new research shows. The small study suggests that you're more likely to overeat in the evening --...
FRIDAY, Jan. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The hours after sunset may be toughest for folks trying to stay slim, new research shows. The small study suggests that you're more likely to overeat in the evening -- especially if you're feeling stressed. "The good news is that having this knowledge, people could take steps to reduce their risk of overeating by eating earlier in the day, or finding alternative ways to deal with stress," said study lead researcher Susan Carnell. She's an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore. The science behind the study focuses on ghrelin, a "hunger hormone," and peptide YY, a hormone tied to feelings of fullness. The study tracked 32 overweight or obese people, aged 18 to 50. Half...
Former NFL Pros Push for End to Kids' Tackle Football
19 January 2018

Former NFL Pros Push for End to Kids' Tackle Football

FRIDAY, Jan. 19, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A group of former National Football League greats -- including Hall of Famers Harry Carson of the New York Giants and Nick Buoniconti of the Miami Dolphins -- is urging parents not to let their children play tackle football until they're at least 14 years old. The group is instead endorsing a program called "Flag Football Under 14," launched by the Concussion Legacy Foundation. The program aims to educate parents and young players about chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Sometimes called CTE, it is a degenerative brain disease caused by repeated blows to the head, and has been detected in more than 85 percent of tackle football players studied over the past 10 years, according to the foundation. "This education program for parents is inspired...
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