Latest Adolescent Health News

16Apr
2020

Juul's Sales Grew Even After Dropping Flavored E-Cigarettes

Juul`s Sales Grew Even After Dropping Flavored E-CigarettesTHURSDAY, April 16, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Weeks after e-cigarette giant Juul voluntarily stopped selling many flavored vaping products popular with U.S. teens, sales rebounded as customers switched to varieties still on the shelves. In fact, sales eventually surpassed previous records, according to new American Cancer Society (ACS) research. "When companies are able to make these decisions for themselves, they are theoretically looking out for consumers, but are really making decisions that are good for the company's bottom line, whereas a regulator is able to make a sweeping decision that can serve the interests of public health," said lead researcher Alex Liber, an ACS senior scientist. In 2018, as vaping surged particularly among American teens, the U.S. Food and Drug...

Early On, Many Seniors Were Unfazed by Coronavirus...

15 April 2020
Early On, Many Seniors Were Unfazed by Coronavirus Warnings, Study FindsWEDNESDAY, April 15, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The coronavirus hits older people and those with chronic medical conditions hardest. But many of these folks didn't take the virus seriously as the outbreak took off in the United States, a new study finds. Before stay-in-place orders were announced, investigators called nearly 700 people in the Chicago area who were part of five U.S. National Institutes of Health studies. Most were 60 and older. The calls were made March 13-20. "They didn't think they would get the virus and weren't changing their daily routine or plans," said lead investigator Michael Wolf, a professor of medicine at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. "If you don't take action early on, it can be too late. Their delayed action to social...

Annual 'COVID-19 Season' May Be Here to Stay, Scientists...

14 April 2020
Annual `COVID-19 Season` May Be Here to Stay, Scientists PredictTUESDAY, April 14, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- COVID-19 is likely to be around for years to come, haunting humans as either a yearly flu-like illness or as a virus that occasionally resurfaces following years of dormancy, a new Harvard modeling study argues. It's unlikely that COVID-19 will go the way of its closest cousin, SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome), which was eradicated by an intense public health effort following a brief pandemic, the researchers said. Instead, COVID-19 is expected to be an ongoing fact of life, with the duration of human immunity determining exactly how often the virus returns. If immunity to the COVID-19 coronavirus is not permanent, the virus will likely enter into regular circulation -- just like the influenza virus or the beta coronaviruses...

Using Pot to Help You Sleep? It Could Backfire

14 April 2020
Using Pot to Help You Sleep? It Could BackfireTUESDAY, April 14, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Teenagers who use marijuana to fall asleep may be setting themselves up for insomnia later in life, a new study suggests. It is widely known that many people rely on marijuana as a sleep aid. In a 2018 survey of 1,000 marijuana users in Colorado, 74% reported that they use it to fall asleep. Still, there is little evidence to suggest that marijuana use actually results in sleep improvements. "There's a lot of research on sleep and cannabis, but it's a little mixed," explained study co-author Evan Winiger, a graduate student in behavioral genetics, psychology and neuroscience at the University of Colorado, in Boulder. In the study, Winiger and his colleagues analyzed the sleep habits and history of marijuana use among 1,882 teens from...

How 4 U.S. Cities Helped Slow Coronavirus Spread

14 April 2020
How 4 U.S. Cities Helped Slow Coronavirus SpreadTUESDAY, April 14, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Stay-at-home orders and other social distancing measures have kept people from going out in four key U.S. cities, likely blunting the spread of COVID-19, federal health officials report. The number of people leaving their homes fell gradually but persistently as officials closed schools, restaurants and bars in New York City, New Orleans, San Francisco and Seattle, according to a study published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. "The CDC report shows that when successive mitigation steps were put into place, individuals tended to heed them," said Dr. Amesh Adalja, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, in Baltimore. The percentage of people leaving home in each of the four cities started...
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