Latest Adolescent Health News

18Jan
2023

Is My Child Too Skinny? Advice on When to Be Concerned

Is My Child Too Skinny? Advice on When to Be Concerned WEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- While childhood obesity gets a lot of attention, some kids struggle with the opposite issue — they have trouble gaining weight.So, how can parents know if their child is “too skinny?”While the best resource is likely a child’s pediatrician, experts have also weighed in on the topic.“Underlying health conditions can result in children and adolescents being underweight. Additionally, underweight can indicate malnutrition,” the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention noted in a recent study about the prevalence of underweight kids in the United States.Just over 4% of children and adolescents aged 2 to 19 were underweight in the United States in 2018, according to the study.To help figure out if your child is too skinny,...

Kids' COVID More Dangerous When Co-Infected With RSV, Colds

18 January 2023
Kids` COVID More Dangerous When Co-Infected With RSV, ColdsWEDNESDAY, Jan. 18, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- As colds, flu and COVID continue to circulate this winter, a new U.S. government study finds that young children infected with COVID plus a second virus tend to become sicker.While severe COVID is rare among children, kids can and do fall ill enough to end up in the hospital.During the pandemic's first two years, young U.S. children who were hospitalized with COVID tended to be more severely ill if they also tested positive for a second respiratory virus, according to the new study, by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.Usually, those coinfections were with one of the many viruses that cause the common cold -- including rhinoviruses, enteroviruses and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).RSV, which can cause more serious lung...

Young Americans Still Want Same Number of Kids, Just Not...

17 January 2023
Young Americans Still Want Same Number of Kids, Just Not Right NowTUESDAY, Jan. 17, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- When birth rates fall in the United States, experts try to figure out what’s happening.The fertility rate is at its lowest since the 1970s -- 1.71 per woman, according to a new study.But it's not that young people today don't want children, new research suggests. In fact, they want about as many as their parents had.Instead, young Americans may simply be having more difficulty achieving life goals in order to have kids, said study co-author Sarah Hayford, director of the Ohio State University Institute for Population Research."You see a lot of things of like, 'Oh, young people just aren't interested in having children' or 'young people have better things to do.' And we don't find that," Hayford said. "We find that young people are interested...

Elementary School Kids Get Healthier When Gardening Is...

16 January 2023
Elementary School Kids Get Healthier When Gardening Is on CurriculumMONDAY, Jan. 16, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- A Texas-based education initiative has found that enrolling children in poor communities in gardening and cooking classes may help boost their long-term health.Called “Texas Sprouts," the program covered one full academic year and exposed elementary school children in 16 low-income schools access to outdoor gardening instruction, nutrition information and cooking lessons. Parents were offered similar classes.The end result? Among the kids, there was a notable post-class drop in the risk for becoming pre-diabetic and diabetic, as measured by lower blood sugar levels, and lower "bad" cholesterol levels.“We know that diets high in added sugar, specifically sugar-sweetened beverages, are linked to higher risk of type 2 diabetes in children,...

Many Women Over 65 Are Dying of Cervical Cancer. What Needs to Change?

16 January 2023
Many Women Over 65 Are Dying of Cervical Cancer. What Needs to Change?MONDAY, Jan. 16, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- A new study shows that many women diagnosed with and dying from cervical cancer are older than 65 -- a group for whom routine screening is usually not recommended.Cervical cancer screening has been credited with a sharp drop in deaths from the disease in the decades since it was introduced in the United States. But current guidelines state that once a woman reaches 65, if she has been regularly screened and gotten a series of normal results in recent years, screening is no longer needed.However, women in that age group can and do develop cervical cancer -- and are often diagnosed at a late stage, research has shown. The new study confirms that in a large group of women.Researchers found that among over 12,000 California women diagnosed with...
RSS
123578910Last
HealthDay

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.