Latest Adolescent Health News

3Aug
2022

Financial Struggles Can Be Tough on Families, And Tough to Explain to Kids

Financial Struggles Can Be Tough on Families, And Tough to Explain to KidsWEDNESDAY, Aug. 3, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Financial pressures may have made this a year when some families can’t afford pricy extras, such as after-school activities or summer camp.It’s OK to explain this to your kids, said an expert from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, who offered tips for the conversation, as well as low-cost alternatives for budget-friendly summer fun.“It’s important to give an optimistic but honest appraisal of budgets,” said Eric Storch, professor and vice chair of psychiatry and behavioral sciences. “If you’re not in a position to spend on camps and extracurriculars, be confident, reassuring and also direct about what you’re spending.”Families of young kids can demonstrate how money works by using tokens, buttons or lima beans in a...

Minnesota Trial Focuses on Pharmacist Who Refused to...

2 August 2022
Minnesota Trial Focuses on Pharmacist Who Refused to Provide Morning-After PillTUESDAY, Aug. 2, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- A Minnesota jury is expected to decide by the end of this week whether a woman's human rights were violated when a pharmacist denied her request to fill a prescription for emergency contraception, sometimes called the morning-after pill.Though the case dates back to 2019, the issue is at the center of political debate in the United States ever since the U.S. Supreme Court removed a woman’s constitutional right to an abortion in June. Concerns about whether contraception rights might also be limited by the conservative court in the future prompted the U.S. House of Representatives last week to pass a bill to guarantee the right. In Minnesota, Andrea Anderson sued pharmacist George Badeaux under the state's Human Rights Act, CBS News reported....

Rising Number of Americans Think It's OK to Harass...

2 August 2022
Rising Number of Americans Think It`s OK to Harass Public Health OfficialsTUESDAY, Aug. 2, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. health officials are in the crosshairs as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, facing threats and harassment from the public they serve.And a growing percentage of U.S. adults are fine with that, according to a new Cornell University study.Analysis of public opinion surveys conducted during the pandemic found double-digit increases among Republicans who considered harassment and threats against public health officials justified. The surveys were conducted in November 2020 and again in July and August 2021.By the end of the study, there was a gap of 15 percentage points between Democrats and Republicans in support of intimidation tactics against health officials. During the pandemic, health officials have suffered attacks at hospitals,...

Eating Disorders Can Begin as Early as Age 9

2 August 2022
Eating Disorders Can Begin as Early as Age 9TUESDAY, Aug. 2, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- More young children may struggle with eating disorders than previously thought, a new study reveals.Data on nearly 12,000 U.S. children between the ages of 9 and 10 that was collected as part of a federally funded study found that 5% had engaged in binge eating, researchers reported. Another 2.5% had taken measures to avoid gaining weight.Researchers also found that boys are just as at risk for disordered eating as girls, based on the results."We tend to think that eating disorders predominantly afflict girls, but there's more and more data showing that boys struggle just as much," lead researcher Stuart Murray, director of the Eating Disorders Program at the University of Southern California's Keck School of Medicine, said in a university news...

Sports Help Kids Gain a Quality Key to Adult Success

2 August 2022
Sports Help Kids Gain a Quality Key to Adult SuccessTUESDAY, Aug. 2, 2022 (HealthDay News) – A quality called “grit” can help a person achieve their long-term goals, some experts say.And playing sports as a kid – or even as an adult – can help a person gain that passion and perseverance, according to new research that found adults who played sports as kids scored higher on a measurement of grit than adults who never played or said they quit.“Kids who participate in sports learn what it is like to struggle as they learn new skills, overcome challenges and bounce back from failure to try again,” said lead author Emily Nothnagle, who did the research as a student in sociology at Ohio State University in Columbus. “The grit they develop playing sports can help them the rest of their lives.”For the study, she and her team...
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