Latest Adolescent Health News

18Apr
2020

How to Avoid Unwanted Weight Gain During COVID-19 Pandemic

How to Avoid Unwanted Weight Gain During COVID-19 PandemicSATURDAY, April 18, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Beware of your fridge, pantry and couch during the coronavirus pandemic. Being cooped up at home with easy access to food can lead to overeating. Couple that with routine housekeeping, working from home, homeschooling your kids and tending to loved ones, and it's a sure-fire recipe for weight gain, experts at the University of Georgia in Athens warn. "These tasks have been added to our many other responsibilities," said Emma Laing, director of dietetics in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences. "So if something has to give as we strive to find our new normal, routines surrounding eating and physical activity might go out the window." To stay on track, get up off the couch. Try to set times during the day for physical activity you...

Ask Grandma to Dance to Boost Her Mood And Strengthen...

17 April 2020
Ask Grandma to Dance to Boost Her Mood And Strengthen Your BondsFRIDAY, April 17, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- If you're a grandparent, shaking a leg with your grandchild might benefit both of you. That's the upshot of a new study from Israel, where researchers examined how dancing together affected 16 grandmas and granddaughters. The takeaway: It can encourage exercise and deepen ties between the two generations. Dancing "promoted physical activity even when the body was fatigued and weak," said study author Dr. Einhat Shuper Englehard, a lecturer at Kibbutzim College in Tel Aviv. "This emphasizes the significance of the close and familiar relationship as a means to promote new experiences [which can occasionally seem impossible] for the older person." The granddaughters -- all dance movement therapists -- teamed with their Bubbes for three...

All That Social Media Hasn't Hurt Kids' Social Skills,...

17 April 2020
All That Social Media Hasn`t Hurt Kids` Social Skills, Study FindsFRIDAY, April 17, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Today's youngsters are as socially skilled as previous generations, despite concerns about their heavy use of technology, like smartphones and social media, new research shows. The researchers compared teacher and parent evaluations of more than 19,000 U.S. children who started kindergarten in 1998 -- six years before Facebook appeared -- with more than 13,000 who began school in 2010. That's when the first iPad came on the market. "In virtually every comparison we made, either social skills stayed the same or actually went up modestly for the children born later," said study lead author Douglas Downey, a professor of sociology at Ohio State University. "There's very little evidence that screen exposure was problematic for the growth of...

Juul's Sales Grew Even After Dropping Flavored E-Cigarettes

16 April 2020
Juul`s Sales Grew Even After Dropping Flavored E-CigarettesTHURSDAY, April 16, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Weeks after e-cigarette giant Juul voluntarily stopped selling many flavored vaping products popular with U.S. teens, sales rebounded as customers switched to varieties still on the shelves. In fact, sales eventually surpassed previous records, according to new American Cancer Society (ACS) research. "When companies are able to make these decisions for themselves, they are theoretically looking out for consumers, but are really making decisions that are good for the company's bottom line, whereas a regulator is able to make a sweeping decision that can serve the interests of public health," said lead researcher Alex Liber, an ACS senior scientist. In 2018, as vaping surged particularly among American teens, the U.S. Food and Drug...

Early On, Many Seniors Were Unfazed by Coronavirus Warnings, Study Finds

15 April 2020
Early On, Many Seniors Were Unfazed by Coronavirus Warnings, Study FindsWEDNESDAY, April 15, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The coronavirus hits older people and those with chronic medical conditions hardest. But many of these folks didn't take the virus seriously as the outbreak took off in the United States, a new study finds. Before stay-in-place orders were announced, investigators called nearly 700 people in the Chicago area who were part of five U.S. National Institutes of Health studies. Most were 60 and older. The calls were made March 13-20. "They didn't think they would get the virus and weren't changing their daily routine or plans," said lead investigator Michael Wolf, a professor of medicine at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. "If you don't take action early on, it can be too late. Their delayed action to social...
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