Latest Adolescent Health News

6Sep
2023

Warm Waters Raise Risk for Flesh-Eating Bacteria. Here's Tips to Stay Safe

Warm Waters Raise Risk for Flesh-Eating Bacteria. Here`s Tips to Stay SafeWEDNESDAY, Sept. 6, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- As waters warm across the United States and hurricanes and flooding season begins, the odds of being infected by flesh-eating bacteria are also rising, U.S. health officials warn. According to a Sept. 1 health alert from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a dozen types of the bacteria called Vibrio cause an estimated 80,000 such illnesses each year. One particular type of bacteria, Vibrio vulnificus, can cause life-threatening "flesh eating" infections. About 150 to 200 of these infections are reported each year and about one in five of those infected die; sometimes within a day or two after becoming ill, the CDC noted in a news release.Vibrio bacteria thrive in warmer water, especially during the summer months and when...

Healthy Eating Doesn't Have to Be Expensive. An Expert...

4 September 2023
Healthy Eating Doesn`t Have to Be Expensive. An Expert Offers TipsMONDAY, Sept. 4, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Groceries cost a lot, but it is possible to eat healthy foods without overspending.Experts at the University of Alabama at Birmingham offer tips for healthy eating on a budget.“Maintaining a healthy diet is not only about what you eat but also about making mindful choices,” said Emily Davidson, employee wellness manager at UAB. “A little planning, creativity and smart shopping can help people enjoy a nutritious diet without breaking the bank.”Planning your meals is key. It saves money that you might otherwise spend on impulse buys. Plan for incorporating fresh, seasonal fruits and vegetables, Davidson suggested.“When planning meals, look for what’s in season,” she said in a university news release. “Notice that some fruits and...

Could 'Float Therapy' Help Ease Anorexia?

1 September 2023
Could `Float Therapy` Help Ease Anorexia?FRIDAY, Sept. 1, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Float therapy, where a patient is suspended in a pool of warm, salty water in a soundproof room, could help ease some aspects of anorexia nervosa, a small new study found. “The idea is that women with anorexia have dysfunctional interoceptive abilities [sensing internal signals from your body], so they're not able to attend to and perceive their bodily experiences in the same way that healthy individuals can,” explained study co-author Emily Choquette, a postdoctoral research associate at the Laureate Institute for Brain Research in Tulsa, Okla. “And one unique thing about floating is that it helps people become more in tune with those body signals.”The research involved 68 women and girls hospitalized for anorexia treatment in a Tulsa...

Marijuana Should Be Moved to Lower-Risk Drug Category,...

31 August 2023
Marijuana Should Be Moved to Lower-Risk Drug Category, U.S. Health Officials SayTHURSDAY, Aug. 31, 2023 (HealthDay News) – The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has asked the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency to reclassify marijuana as a less dangerous drug under the Controlled Substances Act, a move that could potentially expand acceptance of the drug.The DEA confirmed receiving an Aug. 29 letter requesting the change and will begin its own review, a spokesperson told Bloomberg News.The move wouldn’t legalize marijuana, but could move it from its Schedule I classification to a Schedule III. Schedule I drugs, which carry a high risk of abuse, include LSD, ecstasy and heroin. Meanwhile, Schedule III drugs can be obtained with a prescription.Last October, President Joe Biden announced initiatives to ease marijuana penalties. He pardoned all prior simple...

Eat Your Veggies:  Writing 'Produce Prescriptions' Could Boost Patients' Health

29 August 2023
Eat Your Veggies:  Writing `Produce Prescriptions` Could Boost Patients` HealthTUESDAY, Aug. 29, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- An apple a day may be just what the doctor ordered.New research on “produce prescription” programs finds that when access to free fruits and vegetables is offered, recipients see measurable benefits in health and hunger.“To me, this shows that there's a very strong proof of concept behind produce prescriptions and this should, I think, add to the growing momentum to continue to expand access to these programs, but in particular, to increase the quality and the robustness of the evaluations,” said first author Kurt Hager, who did the study as a doctoral student in nutrition science and policy at Tufts University in Boston. He is now an instructor at University of Massachusetts Chan Medical School.The study, published Aug. 29 in...
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