Latest Adolescent Health News

22Oct
2020

Repeal of Obamacare Could Leave Young Cancer Patients in the Lurch

Repeal of Obamacare Could Leave Young Cancer Patients in the LurchTHURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- If Obamacare, or the Affordable Care Act (ACA), is repealed, pediatric cancer patients could lose critical insurance coverage, a new study warns. Kids with cancer often require intensive treatment and long-term follow-up to beat the disease. The ACA allows them to stay on their parents' insurance coverage to age 26 and bans exclusion of patients with preexisting conditions. The U.S. Supreme Court is poised to rule on the future of the ACA this fall. Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco's Benioff Children's Hospital and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia studied the potential impact of dismantling it on 18- to 25-year-old cancer patients. "We know that even brief disruptions in insurance have been associated with...

Could Hospital Visit Records Help Docs Spot ADHD, Autism...

22 October 2020
Could Hospital Visit Records Help Docs Spot ADHD, Autism Early?THURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Kids with autism or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) go to the hospital more in their first year of life than children without these conditions, according to a new study. These findings suggest that keeping track of hospital visits may be a new way to identify these conditions early and that might improve outcomes and lower health care costs, researchers say. "This study provides evidence that children who develop autism and ADHD are on a different path from the beginning," said study lead author Dr. Matthew Engelhard, a senior research associate at Duke University in Durham, N.C. "We have known that children with these diagnoses have more interactions with the health care system after they've been diagnosed, but this...

Fewer Painful Procedures Could Help Preemies' Brain...

21 October 2020
Fewer Painful Procedures Could Help Preemies` Brain Development: StudyWEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Giving fewer needle sticks to premature newborns in the intensive care unit may improve growth of a key brain area, a new study suggests. The thalamus relays sensory data from the body to the rest of the brain, where it registers as pain, touch or temperature. For the study, researchers compared 86 premature infants who had a catheter placed in their central veins and central or peripheral arteries for more than two weeks with 57 infants who had a catheter for less time. The catheters act as portals for blood draws, nutrition and medication, reducing the need for individual needle pokes. Infants who had central lines for longer periods had fewer needle sticks and fewer painful procedures. Those babies also had a bigger thalamus....

Fauci 'Cautiously Optimistic' for COVID-19 Vaccine by...

21 October 2020
Fauci `Cautiously Optimistic` for COVID-19 Vaccine by Year`s EndWEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Dr. Anthony Fauci, the leading infectious disease expert in the United States, said on Wednesday he is "cautiously optimistic" that a COVID-19 vaccine will be ready by year's end. Against the backdrop of a pandemic that has claimed over 220,000 American lives, Fauci noted that the United States' "strategic approach" to vaccine development appears to be bearing fruit. Six U.S. companies, he said, are working around the clock to either facilitate vaccine trials or compile the supplies necessary to distribute a coronavirus vaccine once it's ready. Multiple studies are testing three vaccine approaches, Fauci said. And five of those studies are already in Phase 3, which means testing is underway on large groups of people. "We feel confident...

Nurses Can Make the Difference for New Moms' Breastfeeding

21 October 2020
Nurses Can Make the Difference for New Moms` BreastfeedingWEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- One key to breastfeeding success? Having enough hospital nurses to ensure that new moms get top-notch care. Hospitals with higher rates of exclusive breastfeeding had nurses who provided more consistent care, according to a new report. That care included helping moms have skin-to-skin contact with their babies and breastfeed within an hour of giving birth. Nurses also provided education and encouragement, made referrals to lactation consultants, and kept healthy birth parents and babies together. "Nurses make substantial, often unrecognized, contributions to public health during pregnancy, and during and following birth," said study author Audrey Lyndon, assistant dean for clinical research at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing in New...
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