Latest Fitness News

24Jan
2021

Men, Make Health Your Goal This Year

Men, Make Health Your Goal This YearSUNDAY, Jan. 24, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The new year is the ideal time to focus on your health and one expert has some tips, especially for men, for doing that.According to Dr. Kevin McVary, director of Loyola Medicine Men's Health Center, in Maywood, Ill., "Men don't always focus on their health and, in fact, men are less likely to see a doctor or utilize health resources, and wait longer than women to seek care. Often, it's a man's spouse or partner who convinces him to see a doctor." As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, "a focus on health is especially important this year," McVary said in a Loyola news release."We know that obesity, heart disease, diabetes and a lack of exercise can lead to poorer COVID-19 outcomes. In addition, some men may have stopped eating healthy during the...

For Maximum Effectiveness, De-Stress and Get Healthy...

22 January 2021
For Maximum Effectiveness, De-Stress and Get Healthy Before Your COVID ShotFRIDAY, Jan. 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Not many people have had the opportunity to get the COVID-19 vaccine yet.But while you wait your turn, there are some steps you can take to give the vaccine — whichever brand you get — a boost when it's available to you.An Ohio State University review of 49 vaccine studies dating back 30 years examined how stress, depression and healthy behaviors, such as exercise, can affect immune response to a vaccine.Although it's not realistic to entirely transform your health and habits in a few weeks or months, there are some steps everyone can take — even last-minute ones — to make a difference.Those include getting good sleep as well as exercise in the days before and after you get your shot, said the review's senior author, Janice...

Exercise Doesn't Boost Health If You Stay Obese, Study Finds

22 January 2021
Exercise Doesn`t Boost Health If You Stay Obese, Study FindsFRIDAY, Jan. 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The harmful effects of obesity on the heart can't be undone by exercise, and it's not possible to be "fat but healthy," Spanish researchers warn."Exercise does not seem to compensate for the negative effects of excess weight," said study author Alejandro Lucia, a professor of exercise physiology at European University in Madrid. The study findings "refute the notion that a physically active lifestyle can completely negate the deleterious effects of overweight and obesity," he said.Lucia and his colleagues analyzed data from nearly 528,000 working adults in Spain. The participants' average age was 42 and close to 7 out of 10 were men.About 42% of these adults were normal weight; 41% were overweight, and 18% were obese. Most were inactive...

New Hope Against Diseases Marked by Progressive Scarring...

15 January 2021
New Hope Against Diseases Marked by Progressive Scarring of Lung TissueFRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- An inhaled medication might make every day physical activity a bit easier for patients with serious scarring of the lungs, a new clinical trial finds.The study, published online Jan. 13 in the New England Journal of Medicine, involved patients with high blood pressure in the lungs caused by interstitial lung disease (ILD).ILD is a broad term for progressive scarring of the tissue surrounding the lungs' air sacs and blood vessels. It can have a range of causes, from smoking, to occupational exposure to toxins like asbestos, as well as autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis. Sometimes, no cause can be found.A potential, and serious, complication of that scarring is pulmonary hypertension, in which the vessels that supply blood to the lungs...

Shorter COVID Quarantine for College Athletes a Good Idea, Study Finds

15 January 2021
Shorter COVID Quarantine for College Athletes a Good Idea, Study FindsFRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- After SARS-CoV-2 exposure, a 14-day quarantine is standard among university athletes. But shorter quarantines for these athletes, along with mid-quarantine testing, may improve their compliance without increasing the risk that they'll infect others, a new study suggests.Researchers analyzed data from 620 U.S. college athletes who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 while in quarantine after exposure to the virus.Nearly half (49%) tested positive by the second day of quarantine, and 73% did by day 5.The rate of positive tests declined over the quarantine period.Among athletes who were still negative at day 5 of quarantine, the estimated probability of having a positive test result was 26.9% after day 5; 14.2% after day 7; and 4.7% after day 10....
RSS
1345678910Last
HealthDay

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.