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4Mar
2021

Perils of the Pandemic: Scooters, Cleansers and Button Batteries

Perils of the Pandemic: Scooters, Cleansers and Button BatteriesTHURSDAY, March 4, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Fireworks, skateboards and button batteries are among the products associated with increased trips to the emergency room during the early months of the coronavirus pandemic, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).While ER treatment of product-related injuries fell by about a quarter between March and September of last year, a new report pointed to surges for certain types of products. The report was released to mark National Consumer Protection Week.The rate of severe injury was nearly the same as the year before.Overall, treatment for product-related injuries dropped 24%, but only went down 1% for severe product-related injuries.The largest increases in all age groups involved fireworks and flares (56%); skateboards,...

COVID Leaves Most Pro Athletes With No Lasting Heart...

4 March 2021
COVID Leaves Most Pro Athletes With No Lasting Heart Damage: StudyTHURSDAY, March 4, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- In some reassuring news for professional athletes, a new study finds very few develop inflammatory heart disease after being infected with COVID-19, and most can safely return to play.In fact, of nearly 800 professional athletes who had tested positive, less than 1% were barred from returning to play because of heart damage from COVID-19, researchers said."These findings reinforce the previous recommendation that asymptomatic and mild cases of COVID-19 don't require additional testing in the majority of cases," said lead researcher Dr. Matthew Martinez, director of Atlantic Health System Sports Cardiology at Morristown Medical Center in New Jersey."So, most folks are going to have asymptomatic or mild COVID-19, and they don't necessarily...

U.S. Hispanics at High Heart Disease Risk and Many Go...

4 March 2021
U.S. Hispanics at High Heart Disease Risk and Many Go Untreated: ReportTHURSDAY, March 4, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Even after suffering a stroke, many Hispanic Americans still have uncontrolled diabetes, high blood pressure or other conditions that raise their risk of a repeat one, a new study finds.The study involved 404 Hispanic adults with a history of stroke or "mini-stroke," which is a brief reduction in blood flow to the brain that can foreshadow a full-blown stroke. The researchers found that despite those scares, few patients had their stroke risk factors under control.Awareness did not seem to be the issue: Most patients with high blood pressure, high cholesterol or diabetes knew it.Still, many did not have those conditions under good control, the study found."This shows we have work to do," said senior researcher Dr. Fernando Testai, an...

Could Taking a Swing at Golf Help Parkinson's Patients?

3 March 2021
Could Taking a Swing at Golf Help Parkinson`s Patients?WEDNESDAY, March 3, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- For helping Parkinson's patients improve their balance and mobility, golf may beat the martial art exercise tai chi, a new, small study reveals."Exercise is well-known to treat the symptoms of Parkinson's disease," said study author Dr. Anne-Marie Wills, noting it helps to improve gait, balance and fatigue, while offering a measure of depression relief. Several human and animal studies have also raised the prospect that exercise could help slow disease progression as well, she added.But many Parkinson's patients fail to engage in therapeutic activities. And "there are almost no randomized trials comparing different types of exercise in PD," said Wills, an assistant professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School.To see how golf stacks up...

Sports Position Doesn't Affect Risk of Concussion-Linked CTE Illness

2 March 2021
Sports Position Doesn`t Affect Risk of Concussion-Linked CTE IllnessTUESDAY, March 2, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The position played in sports like football and hockey isn't associated with risk of a concussion-linked brain disease later in life, a new study suggests.The number of years played doesn't affect risk of the neurodegenerative disease -- chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) -- either, researchers found.CTE has been linked with repeated blows to the head. Symptoms include behavioral, mood and thinking problems. The disease often progresses over time and can lead to dementia, according to the study. The results were published online Feb. 24 in the journal Neurology."In football, linemen tend to get more concussions than players at other positions; in hockey, forwards do," said study author Dr. Lili-Naz Hazrati, from the Hospital for Sick...
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