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Stand Up Straight to Strengthen Abs 26Jul
2019

Stand Up Straight to Strengthen Abs

FRIDAY, July 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- While there will always be a place for sit-ups for ab definition, many trainers now suggest standing exercises that not only train abs but back muscles, too. They're more...
Former NFL Players Have Higher Odds for Dangerous A-Fib

Former NFL Players Have Higher Odds for Dangerous A-Fib

24 July 2019
WEDNESDAY, July 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Former pro football players typically have healthier hearts than the average Joe -- except when it comes to a type of heart rhythm disturbance, a new study...
WEDNESDAY, July 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Former pro football players typically have healthier hearts than the average Joe -- except when it comes to a type of heart rhythm disturbance, a new study suggests. Researchers found that former NFL players had a nearly six times higher rate of atrial fibrillation (a-fib), versus other men their age. The condition was present in 5% of 460 former players, versus 0.5% of nonathletes. The reasons are unclear, but the researchers speculate on one potential explanation: the athletes' years of intense strength training. That might sound counterintuitive. But the study is not the first to uncover a heightened risk of a-fib in elite athletes. Previous ones have found that people who spent years in certain endurance sports -- like long-distance...
AHA News: Exercise Caution Outdoors in the Summer Heat

AHA News: Exercise Caution Outdoors in the Summer Heat

24 July 2019
WEDNESDAY, July 24, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- The higher the red line creeps up the thermometer gauge, the more red flags for outdoor exercise. Summer temperatures shouldn't stop you from jogging,...
WEDNESDAY, July 24, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- The higher the red line creeps up the thermometer gauge, the more red flags for outdoor exercise. Summer temperatures shouldn't stop you from jogging, hiking or playing sports outside – but they should alert you to the danger of heat illnesses brought on by exertion. "Think of the heat like you think of a steep hill: Walking is good, but walking up a steep hill is much harder, so scale back the intensity and use more common sense to exercise safely," said Dr. Clifton Callaway, a professor and executive vice chair of emergency medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. More than 600 people die every year in the U.S. from preventable heat-related illnesses, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. An...

Ex-NFL Player Helps Researchers Probe Long-Term Effects...

24 July 2019
WEDNESDAY, July 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Brian Duncan doesn't know why his brain still works as well as it does. Duncan, 67, got his bell rung more than once during his life -- as a professional football player, an amateur boxer and a bull rider at Texas rodeos. He remembers one time he got slammed into the ground by L.C. Greenwood, a 6-foot, 6-inch defensive end for the Pittsburgh Steelers, so hard that he hallucinated he was back playing high school football. "We used to play a team that had a feed lot behind their football stadium," Duncan said. "I'm all of a sudden thinking I'm in high school. I'm seeing cows and stuff behind the stadium, and I'm thinking, what in the world? I'm in Three Rivers Stadium. I was in a different world." Despite that history, Duncan is one of the...
A Health Home Run: Pro Baseball Players Live Longer, Healthier Lives
23 July 2019

A Health Home Run: Pro Baseball Players Live Longer, Healthier Lives

TUESDAY, July 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It can look like a less strenuous sport than football or soccer, but professional baseball players might be the healthiest athletes out there, a new study finds. Athletes in Major League Baseball (MLB) tend to live about 24% longer than the average American guy, according to a century's worth of mortality rates among nearly 10,500 pro baseball players. What's more, baseball players appear to have a lower death rate than National Football League (NFL) players when it comes to neurodegenerative diseases and heart conditions, said senior researcher Marc Weisskopf. He is a professor of environmental epidemiology and physiology with the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, in Boston. "My first suspicion is that they're relatively spared...
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