Latest Fitness News

31Jul
2020

For a Longer Life, Any Exercise Is Good Exercise: Study

For a Longer Life, Any Exercise Is Good Exercise: StudyFRIDAY, July 31, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Want to live longer? Take the stairs, stretch or toss a volleyball around, a new study suggests. Those activities were among several tied to lower rates of early death in an Arizona State University study of nearly 27,000 U.S. adults between 18 and 84 years of age. Researchers wondered which of the more socially oriented exercises -- such as team sports -- contribute to longevity. They asked participants in 1998 which types of activity they engaged in, then watched for causes of death through 2015. While they found that any form exercise helps, stretching and volleyball were uniquely tied to a lower risk of early death. Fitness activities such as walking, cycling and aerobics were also beneficial. Only an association was seen between...

Sports After Lockdown: Take It Slow

24 July 2020
Sports After Lockdown: Take It SlowFRIDAY, July 24, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- If you love to play sports, it's tough advice to follow after months of lockdown: Go easy. You may be tempted to jump right back into things as playing fields, courts, gyms and other athletic facilities reopen, but it's best to take some time for conditioning first, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) says. "For many sports, it has been three months since the last practice. Cardiovascular conditioning, muscle strength and flexibility may have declined with [the] need to social distance," said orthopedic surgeon and AAOS spokesperson Dr. Nicholas DiNubile. "Regardless of your activity, it is important to remember to ease into it and be patient with yourself," he said in an AAOS news release. "If you give yourself time, the...

Even in Dirty Air, Working Out Can Help Cut Risk of High...

20 July 2020
Even in Dirty Air, Working Out Can Help Cut Risk of High Blood PressureTUESDAY, July 21, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Regular exercise can reduce your risk of high blood pressure, even if you live in an area with high levels of air pollution, new research shows. The new study included more than 140,000 adults in Taiwan who did not have high blood pressure and who were followed for an average of five years. The researchers found that those who were highly active and exposed to low levels of air pollution had a lower risk of developing high blood pressure, while inactive people who were exposed to high levels of air pollution had a higher risk. "Extended outdoor activity in urban areas increases the intake of air pollutants, which can worsen the harmful health effects of air pollution," said study author Xiang Qian Lao, an associate professor of public...

AHA News: At Nonprofit Fitness Center, Women Find...

16 July 2020
AHA News: At Nonprofit Fitness Center, Women Find Strength in NumbersTHURSDAY, July 16, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- After more than a decade of driving a Boston city bus, Lorene Thomas was exhausted, overweight and depressed. "Sitting in that seat all the time, I gained weight and had high blood pressure," Thomas said. The 64-year-old also felt traumatized after several scary incidents, including being threatened by a man with a knife. A visit four years ago to HealthWorks Community Fitness, a nonprofit targeting lower-income women, turned her life around. "It's just a few blocks from my house and I'd always passed by there," Thomas said. "I knew I needed to do something." Since starting to exercise, Thomas, who retired two years ago, has lost and kept off 57 pounds, lowered her blood pressure to a normal range and now has enough energy to...

Workouts in the Park? Crime Fears Keep Some Away

12 July 2020
Workouts in the Park? Crime Fears Keep Some AwaySUNDAY, July 12, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Parks can be good for your health, but fear of crime stops some people from using them, a new study finds. Previous research has shown that urban green spaces can lower stress levels, weight and heart disease risk, and that living near a park is linked to fewer days of anxiety and depression. This new study found that New York City residents are more likely to exercise in a park if they live nearby, and the more they do so, the less anxious and depressed they feel -- but only if they're not concerned about their safety. For the study, New York University (NYU) researchers analyzed survey responses from more than 3,800 people. The survey results showed that nearly twice as many New Yorkers who lived within a five-minute walk from a park said...
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