Latest Fitness News

16Feb
2018

Health Tip:Ski and Snowboard Safely With Your Kids

(HealthDay News) -- Skiing and snowboarding are great ways to keep your family active during the cold winter months. But as with any winter activity, you should avoid prolonged exposure to the cold by scheduling breaks to go inside and warm up. The American Academy of Pediatrics offers these suggestions for skiing or snowboarding with your children: Children should be taught toski or snowboardby a qualified instructor in a program designed for children. Never ski or snowboard alone. Young children should always be supervised by an adult. Older children's need for adult supervision depends on their maturity and skill. If older children are not with an adult, they should always be accompanied by a friend. All skiers and snowboarders should wear helmets. Equipment should fit the child...

Health Tip:Balance Moves for Older Adults

15 February 2018
(HealthDay News) -- Balance exercises can help prevent falls, especially among older adults. But before you begin any exercise program, always consult your doctor. The American Council on Exercise mentions these common balance exercises for active older adults: Side X Balance Reach -- Stand on the right leg and lean the body toward the right. Point the right shoulder toward the sky. The body makes half of an "X" shape. Touch down as needed with the left toes. Continue balancing on this side for up to two minutes, then change sides. Stand and Twist -- Begin standing on the left leg and raise the right knee up until the upper thigh is parallel to the floor. You can modify by raising just the heel of the right foot. Bring the hands together in a prayer position, then point the...
It May Be Winter, But Keep That Sunscreen Handy

It May Be Winter, But Keep That Sunscreen Handy

10 February 2018
SATURDAY, Feb. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Just because it's not summer doesn't mean you're safe from sun-related skin damage. "The highest level of concern is usually during the summer months, but sun damage can...
SATURDAY, Feb. 10, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Just because it's not summer doesn't mean you're safe from sun-related skin damage. "The highest level of concern is usually during the summer months, but sun damage can occur year-round, even on cloudy or rainy days," said dermatologist Dr. Sarah Taylor, an assistant professor at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C. "In fact, many people don't realize that you also get sun exposure through windows at the office, at home or in cars," she said in a hospital news release. That's why "dermatologists recommend that everyone wear broad-spectrum sunscreen every day, all year," Taylor said. To best protect your skin from the sun, she suggests: Using broad-spectrum, physical blocker sunscreens with zinc oxide or titanium...
You, Too, Can Eat Like an Olympian

You, Too, Can Eat Like an Olympian

9 February 2018
FRIDAY, Feb. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- While you watch the Winter Olympics from the comfort of your couch in the coming weeks, pay heed to what helped the athletes reach peak physical condition. "Olympians can...
FRIDAY, Feb. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- While you watch the Winter Olympics from the comfort of your couch in the coming weeks, pay heed to what helped the athletes reach peak physical condition. "Olympians can teach us a lot about how to eat for better health and performance," said Kaley Mialki, a dietitian with the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. "Fueling and hydrating properly are very important to help us perform our best, whether we are Olympians or average exercisers," she said in a university news release. A major difference between elite athletes and people in the general population is the number of calories athletes need to consume. "While we may not need the same amount of food as Olympians, like Olympians, we can benefit from...
Head Injuries Hit 1 in 14 Kids, CDC Reports
9 February 2018

Head Injuries Hit 1 in 14 Kids, CDC Reports

FRIDAY, Feb. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Given the news of the devastating effects of head injuries among professional football players, parents may wonder if their mini athletes are at risk, too. Some very well might be, new research suggests. About 7 percent of children 3 to 17 years old have experienced a head injury, according to U.S. health officials. The findings are part of a report on children's head injuries released Feb. 9 by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More boys (8 percent) than girls (6 percent) have had a significant head injury, according to the data. And the older kids are, the more likely they are to have had such an injury. Nearly 12 percent of 15- to 17-year-olds have had a significant head injury, the report showed. This "suggests that...
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