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Hey Kids, Just Say No to Energy Drinks 9Feb
2018

Hey Kids, Just Say No to Energy Drinks

FRIDAY, Feb. 9, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Highly caffeinated energy drinks aren't safe for children and teens, and should not be marketed to them, a leading sports medicine organization warns. The American College of...
Exergaming: Workouts That Work for All Ages

Exergaming: Workouts That Work for All Ages

7 February 2018
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- "Exergaming" -- playing video games that get you off the sofa and into the action -- has positive fitness benefits that span the generations. It can be a way to introduce...
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 7, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- "Exergaming" -- playing video games that get you off the sofa and into the action -- has positive fitness benefits that span the generations. It can be a way to introduce sedentary kids to exercise and even keep seniors fit. Because it engages the mind, it also may lead to better cognitive function in your later years as well. Whether simulating tennis, golf or dance, which is particularly effective at burning calories, these games engage your entire body in interactive physical activity. Exergaming has many things going for it. First of all, it's fun, and that's important if you think of exercise as a chore. Many people don't even feel like they're exercising as they play. If you choose a game for two or more, you get the benefits of...
Going for a Walk Not So Easy for Many Pugs

Going for a Walk Not So Easy for Many Pugs

6 February 2018
TUESDAY, Feb. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Most dogs are excited to hear the words "Want to go for a walk?" But one-third of pug dogs have an abnormal gait, and this may be a more serious health problem for this...
TUESDAY, Feb. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Most dogs are excited to hear the words "Want to go for a walk?" But one-third of pug dogs have an abnormal gait, and this may be a more serious health problem for this breed than previously thought, researchers say. The finding was based on survey responses from 550 owners of pugs registered with the Swedish Kennel Club. All dogs were 1, 5 or 8 years old. Through owners' reports and videos of the dogs walking on a leash, the researchers found that 31 percent of the pugs had a gait abnormality or indications of one. The study authors described this as a high percentage. Abnormalities included lameness, poor coordination and weakness. Indirect signs of gait abnormality included a dog's inability to jump and unusual wearing of the nails and...
Exercise May Help Lung Cancer Surgery Go More Smoothly

Exercise May Help Lung Cancer Surgery Go More Smoothly

2 February 2018
FRIDAY, Feb. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Lung cancer patients can halve their risk of postop complications by taking up an exercise program before their surgery, a new report suggests. For the study, researchers...
FRIDAY, Feb. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Lung cancer patients can halve their risk of postop complications by taking up an exercise program before their surgery, a new report suggests. For the study, researchers analyzed reports on 13 clinical trials that included a total of over 800 people who had surgery for cancer. The patients had been treated for cancer of the bowel, liver, esophagus, lung, mouth or prostate. Among lung cancer patients, engaging in regular exercise before surgery was tied to 48 percent lower odds of postoperative complications. In addition, these patients were released from the hospital about three days earlier than others, the investigators found. And the more exercise lung cancer patients did, the lower their risk of complications, according to study...
Do NFL Players Face a Higher Risk of Early Death?
1 February 2018

Do NFL Players Face a Higher Risk of Early Death?

THURSDAY, Feb. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The Philadelphia Eagles and New England Patriots playing in Sunday's Super Bowl may have already taken a hidden hit before setting foot on the field, a new study suggests. The new research says career NFL players have a slightly higher risk of early death than a group of replacement players who stood in for a few games during a short league strike in the 1980s. The overall difference in death rates did not reach statistical significance, but NFL players were more likely than replacements to suffer deaths related to neurological disorders and drug overdoses, the study authors said. The results "motivate a harder look at NFL and replacement players as they age, because I think we can really learn a lot," said study author Dr. Atheendar...
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