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Many Stroke Survivors Don't Improve Health Habits 24Jan
2018

Many Stroke Survivors Don't Improve Health Habits

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- While you might think most people would try to change unhealthy behaviors after a major health scare like a stroke, new research suggests most people don't. They may even...
Turn Your Commute Into a Daily Workout

Turn Your Commute Into a Daily Workout

24 January 2018
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Commuting by car doesn't just try your patience. An Australian study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found that it can also lead to weight gain,...
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 24, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Commuting by car doesn't just try your patience. An Australian study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found that it can also lead to weight gain, even if you're active on the weekends. One answer is to turn at least part of your commute into a workout. As cities with municipal bike programs like New York and Cleveland have shown, biking is a quick way to get around and get great exercise. You don't have to be a world-class cyclist or even go very fast to gain benefits from this low-impact cardio activity. Of course, you want to take all the necessary safety precautions. That means making sure your bike is in good working order. Wear a helmet plus any other protective gear that's appropriate for you. Obey local...
How to Sit Less, Move More

How to Sit Less, Move More

23 January 2018
TUESDAY, Jan. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Even if you're parked in front of a computer during the day, new research suggests that some simple changes can offset the health damage of all that sitting. "Even if we...
TUESDAY, Jan. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Even if you're parked in front of a computer during the day, new research suggests that some simple changes can offset the health damage of all that sitting. "Even if we exercise regularly, most of us sit or recline for an average of 11 hours a day," said researcher Wuyou Sui, a doctoral student in the department of kinesiology at the University of Western Ontario. "Our bodies just aren't designed to function well with such low levels of activity -- we all have to move more often than we do, or endure a variety of chronic health issues," Sui said in a university news release. The researchers recruited university students to undergo a six-week program designed to change sedentary behavior. The students had to choose the strategies that were...
Lack of Vitamin D Can Sideline College Football Players

Lack of Vitamin D Can Sideline College Football Players

23 January 2018
TUESDAY, Jan. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 60 percent of college football players have low levels of vitamin D, a new study suggests. That means they face a significantly higher risk for muscle strain and...
TUESDAY, Jan. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 60 percent of college football players have low levels of vitamin D, a new study suggests. That means they face a significantly higher risk for muscle strain and injury, the researchers said. "We were interested in vitamin D in this population because it's been shown to play an important role in muscle function and strength, which is critical to the high-performance athlete," said study author Dr. Brian Rebolledo. He's an orthopedic surgeon at the Scripps Clinic in La Jolla, Calif. "Most of the past research into the harmful effects of low vitamin D has focused on the elderly, but relatively few studies have examined this association in the elite athlete," Rebolledo said in a Scripps news release. "This study suggests that monitoring...
Dirty Water Taking Toll on Americans' Health, Wallets
23 January 2018

Dirty Water Taking Toll on Americans' Health, Wallets

TUESDAY, Jan. 23, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Water pollution is damaging Americans' health, and at a high financial cost, too, new research finds. Water-related recreational activities lead to more than 90 million cases a year of gastrointestinal, respiratory, ear, eye and skin-related illnesses in the United States, according to the study. The researchers calculated that those illnesses result in $2.9 billion a year in medical costs and costs related to time away from work or school. For the study, researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago assessed waterborne illnesses contracted from swimming, paddling, boating and fishing in lakes, rivers and other natural bodies of water. The study did not examine illnesses associated with swimming pools or water parks. "The costs...
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