Latest Fitness News

22Jun
2023

Danger Afoot: U.S. Pedestrian Deaths at Highest Level in 41 Years

Danger Afoot: U.S. Pedestrian Deaths at Highest Level in 41 YearsTHURSDAY, June 22, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- More than 7,500 people were killed last year after being struck by vehicles while walking along or across U.S. roadways — the most pedestrian deaths in more than four decades, according to a new report.This sobering trend was not surprising to experts who track the numbers. But they were dismayed by the consistent increase — up 77% since 2010.“This is unacceptable. It's really mind-boggling. It hard to wrap your head around, at least it's hard for me to wrap my head, 20 deaths every single day,” said Adam Snider, a spokesman for the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA), which reported state-by-state numbers this week.“And then when you think about how many people each single death affects: family members, neighbors, friends,...

Head Injury Outcomes Could Take Years to Unfold

22 June 2023
Head Injury Outcomes Could Take Years to UnfoldTHURSDAY, June 22, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- A traumatic brain injury (TBI) can have long-term effects, much like a chronic condition, a new study says.Looking at hundreds of patients, researchers found that problems related to traumatic brain injuries can last for years, with people improving and declining at different time points. These problems encompassed memory, thinking and everyday functioning. "TBI is essentially a chronic condition like many other chronic conditions," said lead researcher Benjamin Brett, an assistant professor in the Departments of Neurosurgery and Neurology at the Medical College of Wisconsin. "Things can change, both up and down, improve and decline throughout multiple years."Because of this, there's a need to monitor patients "well beyond that post-injury...

Preventing Alzheimer's: Here's 6 Ways You May Reduce...

19 June 2023
Preventing Alzheimer`s: Here`s 6 Ways You May Reduce Your RiskMONDAY, June 19, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Alzheimer's robs its victims of their memories and there is no cure, but there are things you can do to prevent Alzheimer's disease.With Alzheimer's, two types of brain proteins, called tau tangles and beta-amyloid plaques, grow out of control. According to Harvard Health, these proteins destroy brain cells and cause symptoms like confusion, memory loss and personality changes.Yet, there are many preventive measures that can be taken to reduce your risk of developing Alzheimer’s. Here are six ways you can help prevent this debilitating condition and protect your brain health.How to prevent Alzheimer’sExerciseAccording to Alzheimer’s Society UK, the results of 11 studies revealed that Alzheimer’s risk was reduced by 45% for middle-aged...

Study of Former NFL Players Shows Race Differences in...

19 June 2023
Study of Former NFL Players Shows Race Differences in Chronic PainMONDAY, June 19, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- A pro football career can mean chronic pain after retirement, but Black players are especially hard-hit, a new study finds.The study, of nearly 4,000 former National Football League (NFL) players, found that Black men reported more intense, more debilitating pain than their white counterparts. They were also more likely to suffer from depression, anxiety or fatigue -- and those problems were often related to their pain levels.Researchers said the findings speak to a larger, well-documented issue: Black Americans are more affected by chronic pain, and less likely to have it effectively treated, than white people.And it appears those disparities are not erased by the status and resources that can come with being a professional athlete."I do think...

Why Exercise Is Often a Challenge for Folks With Type 1 Diabetes

16 June 2023
Why Exercise Is Often a Challenge for Folks With Type 1 DiabetesFRIDAY, June 16, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- It can be challenging for people with type 1 diabetes to exercise safely while controlling their blood sugar.People with the condition often struggle with this balance, according to a new study based on a survey conducted through social media groups restricted to adults with type 1 diabetes who run, jog or walk for exercise. The survey findings were presented Thursday at a meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Chicago. “Managing high and low blood sugar levels before, during and after aerobic exercise remains one of the greatest challenges for people living with type 1 diabetes,” said lead researcher Dr. Joseph Henske, an endocrinologist at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock. “This study provides a number of key...
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