Latest Fitness News

6Jan
2018

How to Get Your Health on Track for 2018

How to Get Your Health on Track for 2018SATURDAY, Jan. 6, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- For those still open to adding to their list of New Year's resolutions, the American Medical Association (AMA) is offering its top 10 healthy suggestions. First, Americans should make an effort to cut back on sugary drinks, medical experts advise. Diabetes screening is also a good proactive step as the new year unfolds. The AMA suggests trying an online tool -- a self-screening website -- to help you do just that. Go to DoIHavePrediabetes.org. Increasing physical activity is another good idea, based on the notion that all adults aged 18 to 65 should rack up at least a half-hour of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise five days a week. Or, as an alternative, you can try 20 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic exercise three times a...

'Mountain Madness' Found to Be a Real Psychosis

5 January 2018
`Mountain Madness` Found to Be a Real PsychosisFRIDAY, Jan. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The "madness" mountain climbers often experience isn't a type of altitude sickness, as once thought, but rather an actual psychotic disorder, a new study suggests. The study authors explained that mountaineers can suddenly lose touch with reality. Some believe they're being chased. Others start talking to an imaginary person, or talk without making any sense. Now, researchers have given this common phenomenon a definition and a name: isolated high-altitude psychosis. "In our study, we found that there was a group of symptoms which are purely psychotic," said co-author Hermann Brugger, head of the Institute of Mountain Emergency Medicine in Italy, part of Eurac Research. These symptoms are not linked to brain swelling at high altitude or...

Exercise Boosts Kids' Brain Health, Too

5 January 2018
Exercise Boosts Kids` Brain Health, TooFRIDAY, Jan. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A lack of exercise puts kids at risk for very adult problems, like obesity and diabetes. Now there's also research that links exercise to their cognitive development and achievement in school. Turns out that physical activity gives the young brain needed boosts, according to a study published in Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development. Active children do better in class and on tests because exercise seems to lead to larger brain volumes in areas associated with memory and thinking functions, such as behavior and decision-making. Active kids also appear to have better concentration and longer attention spans -- being fit helps them stay focused to complete assignments, the study authors reported. These findings appear to be...

Need Motivation to Exercise? Try the Buddy System

4 January 2018
Need Motivation to Exercise? Try the Buddy SystemTHURSDAY, Jan. 4, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Exercising with a buddy can give you both mental and fitness boosts. In fact, under the right conditions, the intensity and duration of exercise among workout partners can be more than twice that of solo efforts, according to research led by Kansas State University's Dr. Brandon Irwin. Here's how to make the most of a buddy relationship. Studies show that the best exercise partner is someone about 40 percent more fit than you are -- this will motivate you to work out longer and harder. It's called the "Kohler effect" -- the ability to perform at a higher level when working with a stronger person. But if you're a novice, you don't want someone so far advanced that you could hurt yourself trying to keep up. If you're in a fitness class and...

Don't Let Baby Weight Linger Between Pregnancies

3 January 2018
Don`t Let Baby Weight Linger Between PregnanciesWEDNESDAY, Jan. 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Gaining too much baby weight is an issue for many pregnant women. What's more, if you don't lose those pounds, they could pose a problem during your next pregnancy, according to a study published in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology. Researchers looked at nearly 8,000 women who had babies two years apart and found that those who didn't get back to their pre-pregnancy weight before they conceived again had more complications during the second pregnancy. These issues ranged from an increased risk for Caesarean sections to gestational diabetes and high blood pressure. According to the American Public Health Association, being overweight or obese also increases the risk for heart disease and stroke, conditions that can threaten a pregnancy....
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