Latest Fitness News

6Aug
2019

Health Tip: Benefits of Yoga

(HealthDay News) -- The ancient practice of yoga can provide a retreat from the chaos of life, says Harvard Medical School. Yoga's goal is to challenge yourself physically without feeling overwhelmed. The practice has been noted to provide both mental and physical benefits. These benefits include: A better body image. Mindful eating habits. Reduced tension, stress and anxiety. Increased physical fitness. If you have any health concerns about your ability to practice yoga, check with your doctor before starting a program.

Health Tip: Fit Walking into Your Schedule

5 August 2019
(HealthDay News) -- Walking is a versatile form of exercise that can be done most anywhere. The American Heart Association suggests that adults spend at least 30 minutes each day doing a moderate intensity activity. Fitting brisk walking into your daily schedule is one way to meet that goal. To fit walking into your schedule, the AHA suggests: Park or get off at the bus/train station 10 minutes away from your job. Schedule a lunchtime walk in your work calendar. Keep everything at work that you'll need for walking. Listen to music while walking, or recruit friends to walk with you. Before going to bed, lay out your walking clothes and shoes. If you decide to walk at night, the AHA reminds you to wear reflective clothing or carry a light.
Stand Up Straight to Strengthen Abs

Stand Up Straight to Strengthen Abs

26 July 2019
FRIDAY, July 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- While there will always be a place for sit-ups for ab definition, many trainers now suggest standing exercises that not only train abs but back muscles, too. They're more...
FRIDAY, July 26, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- While there will always be a place for sit-ups for ab definition, many trainers now suggest standing exercises that not only train abs but back muscles, too. They're more practical than getting down on the floor, and they may also be more effective because the moves strengthen the body's core muscles, making everyday movements -- forward, backward and side-to-side -- easier. Training them may also help you avoid the low-back pain that typically comes with age. Start with side bends. Stand with feet shoulder-width apart and hold a light dumbbell in each hand, hands at your sides. Slowly bend to the right as far as you can without twisting your upper body. Your right hand will dip slightly toward your right knee. Hold, slowly return to start...
Former NFL Players Have Higher Odds for Dangerous A-Fib

Former NFL Players Have Higher Odds for Dangerous A-Fib

24 July 2019
WEDNESDAY, July 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Former pro football players typically have healthier hearts than the average Joe -- except when it comes to a type of heart rhythm disturbance, a new study...
WEDNESDAY, July 24, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Former pro football players typically have healthier hearts than the average Joe -- except when it comes to a type of heart rhythm disturbance, a new study suggests. Researchers found that former NFL players had a nearly six times higher rate of atrial fibrillation (a-fib), versus other men their age. The condition was present in 5% of 460 former players, versus 0.5% of nonathletes. The reasons are unclear, but the researchers speculate on one potential explanation: the athletes' years of intense strength training. That might sound counterintuitive. But the study is not the first to uncover a heightened risk of a-fib in elite athletes. Previous ones have found that people who spent years in certain endurance sports -- like long-distance...
AHA News: Exercise Caution Outdoors in the Summer Heat
24 July 2019

AHA News: Exercise Caution Outdoors in the Summer Heat

WEDNESDAY, July 24, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- The higher the red line creeps up the thermometer gauge, the more red flags for outdoor exercise. Summer temperatures shouldn't stop you from jogging, hiking or playing sports outside – but they should alert you to the danger of heat illnesses brought on by exertion. "Think of the heat like you think of a steep hill: Walking is good, but walking up a steep hill is much harder, so scale back the intensity and use more common sense to exercise safely," said Dr. Clifton Callaway, a professor and executive vice chair of emergency medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. More than 600 people die every year in the U.S. from preventable heat-related illnesses, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. An...
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