Latest Fitness News

20May
2023

Why Taking Your Kids to the Park Is Always a Healthy Idea

Why Taking Your Kids to the Park Is Always a Healthy IdeaSATURDAY, May 20, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Need an activity to do with your kids on spring and summer days? Go to the park.Outdoor play is good for physical health, mental well-being and reduced stress in children, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).“Whether it’s sunny or snowing, playing outside is good for children, physically and mentally,” said pediatrician Dr. Monique Jonae Soileau-Burke, president of AAP's Maryland chapter. “Scientific evidence tells us that playing outdoors can improve health, and children love it," she said in an academy news release. "On Kids to Parks Day [May 20], we encourage families to make plans to get their children out into nature for summer fun and well-being. Consider visiting a national, state or local park.”People who...

New 'National Sports Brain Bank' Will Boost Head Injury...

19 May 2023
New `National Sports Brain Bank` Will Boost Head Injury ResearchFRIDAY, May 19, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- A new brain bank is accepting future donations from living athletes, in an effort to perform long-term research into the effects of sports-related concussion.The National Sports Brain Bank (NSBB) at the University of Pittsburgh will track the health of living participants on an annual basis, and will autopsy their donated brains after their death.“We want to follow prospective donors longitudinally while they're still alive and get information from them about their sports participation, trauma, history, other medical history, any symptoms they may experience,” said NSBB Director Dr. Julia Kofler.“We can then correlate their clinical information with what we see down the road under the microscope, at the time of autopsy,” she said.Two...

Exercise No Threat to People With an Inherited Form of...

19 May 2023
Exercise No Threat to People With an Inherited Form of Enlarged HeartFRIDAY, May 19, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- People with the rare heart disorder hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) can safely engage in vigorous exercise, according to new research.This finding could lead to fewer activity restrictions for people with this condition, which involves the heart muscle becoming thickened and enlarged.HCM is an inherited disorder that affects about one in 500 people worldwide. It is associated with sudden cardiac death in young people. Yet the U.S. National Institutes of Health-funded study found that those who exercised vigorously are no more likely to die or experience severe cardiac events than those who exercised moderately or not at all.“Based on these data, we’re learning that we don’t need to universally restrict HCM patients from participating in...

Another Possible Exercise Bonus: Preventing Parkinson's

18 May 2023
Another Possible Exercise Bonus: Preventing Parkinson`sTHURSDAY, May 18, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Regular exercise has a long list of health benefits, and a new study suggests another one could be added: a lower risk of Parkinson's disease.The study, of nearly 99,000 French women, found that those who were most physically active day to day were 25% less likely to develop Parkinson's over three decades, versus women who were more sedentary.That does not prove that exercise, per se, is responsible, the researchers said. At the same time, they say it's unlikely that the link reflects "reverse-causation" -- women in the earliest stages of Parkinson's being less likely to exercise.That's because the study assessed the women's exercise habits for up to 20 years before their Parkinson's diagnosis.And since regular exercise clearly has benefits...

Even Decades After Use, Anabolic Steroids Could Take Big Toll on Health

16 May 2023
Even Decades After Use, Anabolic Steroids Could Take Big Toll on HealthTUESDAY, May 16, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Lured by promises of bigger muscles and better performance on the field, many athletes and bodybuilders turn to anabolic steroids despite their well-known side effects, including increased risk for heart disease and mood issues.Now, two new studies show these harms may persist after athletes stop taking the synthetic hormones.The message is clear when it comes to the illegal use of anabolic steroids to boost muscle mass and enhance athletic performance: “Don’t do it,” warned study author Dr. Yeliz Bulut. She is a doctoral student at Copenhagen University Hospital in Denmark.In one study of 64 healthy men aged 18 to 50 who engaged in recreational strength training, 28 were using anabolic steroids, 22 were former steroid users and 14 had...
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