Latest Fitness News

13Sep
2022

How Many Steps a Day (and How Fast) to Lengthen Your Life?

How Many Steps a Day (and How Fast) to Lengthen Your Life?TUESDAY, Sept. 13, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- There's an easy way to reduce your risk for dementia, heart disease and cancer: Start walking.Getting in those recommended 10,000 steps a day makes a real difference, new research affirms, but even fewer will pay big dividends. No matter how many you log, however, step up your pace for the biggest benefit.For every 2,000 steps you log, up to about 10,000 a day, your risk of early death drops by between 8% and 11%, researchers found."So, 10,000 steps maximizes the chances of getting all these benefits, but also for inactive people who can't engage in so many steps — any steps have benefits — every step counts," said lead researcher Borja del Pozo Cruz of the Center for Active and Healthy Aging at the University of Southern Denmark in...

Getting Kids Walking, Biking to School Can Lead to...

9 September 2022
Getting Kids Walking, Biking to School Can Lead to Long-Term FitnessFRIDAY, Sept. 9, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Kids who walk, skateboard or ride their bikes to school when they are young are more likely to keep it up as they get older, reaping the health benefits, recent research suggests.“The walk to school is a wonderful moment in the day that provides children a glimpse of living an active lifestyle,” said study co-author David Tulloch, a professor of landscape architecture at Rutgers University-New Brunswick in New Jersey. “When people start walking early, it can have a lasting impact on their health.”About 11% of kids in the United States walk or ride their bikes to or from school, according to the National Household Travel Survey. This rate hasn't changed in a decade.In the study, the researchers found that kids are much more likely to...

Too Little Exercise, Too Much Sitting Could Raise Breast...

8 September 2022
Too Little Exercise, Too Much Sitting Could Raise Breast Cancer RiskTHURSDAY, Sept. 8, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Sitting on the couch or behind a desk could be increasing your risk of breast cancer, a new genetics-driven study suggests.People more likely to engage in physical activity based on their DNA had a 41% lower risk of invasive breast cancer, researchers report.Previous research also has shown a link between exercise and reduced cancer risk, but “our study suggests that the strength of the relationship may be even stronger than suggested by observational studies,” said senior researcher Brigid Lynch, deputy head of cancer epidemiology for Cancer Council Victoria, in Melbourne, Australia.“Our study also suggests that sedentary behavior may increase the risk of breast cancer,” Lynch continued. “The risk increase is greater for...

Can You Get Monkeypox at the Gym?

2 September 2022
Can You Get Monkeypox at the Gym?FRIDAY, Sept. 2, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Yes, you can get monkeypox at the gym, but there's no need to panic, one expert says.“We have plenty of ways to protect ourselves in this setting,” said Dr. Thomas Giordano, chief of infectious diseases at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. First, wipe down equipment including weight machines, dumbbells, barbells and yoga mats, before and after use. Don’t share gym towels because the virus can be spread by touching a towel used by someone who has the virus.“Most of the surfaces you’re coming across in the gym are hard, like plastic and metal, and not porous, like towels and linens,” Giordano said in a Baylor news release. “Because many gyms provided cleaning solutions before and during the COVID-19 pandemic, you can easily...

Exercise Rates Still Haven't Recovered From Pandemic, Global Study Shows

1 September 2022
Exercise Rates Still Haven`t Recovered From Pandemic, Global Study ShowsTHURSDAY, Sept. 1, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The COVID-19 pandemic stopped people in their tracks, reducing their physical activity. And daily "step counts" still haven't reached previous numbers, according to a new study. Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco examined worldwide trends in physical activity by measuring step counts in the two years following the start of the pandemic. Step counts were distinctly lower early in the pandemic compared to pre-pandemic levels and remained lower for the first two years of the global crisis, the study team found."As the global pandemic persists, understanding its long-term ramifications on physical activity is crucial," said cardiologist and study co-author Dr. Geoffrey Tison. Exercise guidelines for Americans call for at...
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