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2May
2022

Therapies That Can Help Ease Long COVID Breathlessness, Fatigue

Therapies That Can Help Ease Long COVID Breathlessness, FatigueMONDAY, May 2, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Occupational therapy or low-impact exercise might be the key to relieving long-haul COVID symptoms like extreme fatigue, breathlessness and brain fog, a pair of new studies from Ireland suggest.The studies reflect two different — in some ways, opposite — approaches to dealing with symptoms that tend to plague long COVID patients.One study taught long COVID patients through a four-week occupational therapy program how to better manage their fatigue, with an emphasis on energy planning, stress management and sleep hygiene.The other attempted to improve long-haul symptoms through a six-week exercise program aimed at gradually increasing patients' stamina."The main problem is extreme fatigue that is unrelenting," said Louise Norris, lead...

Spring Sprains: Sports Injury Season Begins

1 May 2022
Spring Sprains: Sports Injury Season Begins SUNDAY, May 1, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- As youth spring sports kick into high gear, it's important to know about injury prevention and treatment, an expert says. Injury risks and preventive measures can vary by sport, according to Dr. Marcus Knox, a physical therapist in the department of orthopedic surgery at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. Young baseball pitchers are at risk for shoulder and elbow injuries, and younger children are prohibited from certain pitches — such as curve balls — due to the stress they put on certain parts of the body. Shoulder injuries can also occur in softball pitchers, as well as hip and low back pain problems, Knox noted.Hip and hamstring injuries can be an issue for track and field athletes. Runners, long jumpers and high jumpers may be...

Former College Football Players Suffer More Brain...

21 April 2022
Former College Football Players Suffer More Brain Disorders as They AgeTHURSDAY, April 21, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- College football players live longer than those who didn't play, but they suffer more brain-related issues as they age, a new study finds.Among former Notre Dame football players, being physically fit was tied to lower deaths from heart disease and diabetes. But the former players were five times more likely to have impaired thinking and memory ("cognition") and 2.5 times more likely to suffer recurrent headaches, the researchers found."We found that the overall [death rate] among the former college football players was significantly lower than the general U.S. population of same-age men," said lead researcher Robert Stern. He is director of clinical research at Boston University's CTE Center. (CTE, or chronic traumatic encephalopathy, is...

How Does Exercise Guard Against Dementia? Study Reveals...

20 April 2022
How Does Exercise Guard Against Dementia? Study Reveals CluesWEDNESDAY, April 20, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise may help safeguard your brain as you age, and a new study suggests how this might happen.Previous research has shown that physical activity helps protect brain cells. This paper indicates it may do that through lower levels of insulin and body fat."These results may help us to understand how physical activity affects brain health, which may guide us in developing strategies to prevent or delay age-related decline in memory and thinking skills," said study co-author Géraldine Poisnel, from Inserm Research Center in Caen, France.The study included 134 people, average age 69, who had no memory problems. They completed questionnaires about their physical activity over the past year. Researchers also gathered information on the...

What Works Best for Ruptured Achilles Tendons?

14 April 2022
What Works Best for Ruptured Achilles Tendons?THURSDAY, April 14, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- A ruptured Achilles tendon can reduce a weekend warrior to a limping one. And there's no single right way to treat it.People who've suffered this common injury may fare just as well with physical therapy as with surgery, a new clinical trial shows.The Achilles is the largest tendon in the body, connecting the calf muscles to the heel bone. When it ruptures, often during sports or high-impact exercise, fibers in the tendon tear and separate.Studies have suggested that on average, people with Achilles tendon ruptures have similar outcomes whether they have surgery to stitch the tendon back together or go for rehab therapy alone.But those studies have been small, said Dr. Stale Myhrvold, the lead researcher on the new trial.That makes it harder...
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