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27Oct
2020

Spouses Share a Lot – Including Heart Health, Study Shows

Spouses Share a Lot – Including Heart Health, Study ShowsTUESDAY, Oct. 27, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Many married couples or domestic partners share a lot: the same house, bills, pets and maybe children. A new study found they often also share the same behaviors and risk factors that can lead to heart disease. Researchers assessed heart disease risks and lifestyle behaviors of nearly 5,400 U.S. couples enrolled in an employee wellness program. They used the risk factors spelled out in the American Heart Association Life's Simple 7: smoking status, physical activity, healthy diet, total cholesterol, blood pressure, fasting blood sugar and body mass index (BMI, a measure of body fat based on height and weight). They categorized participants' results individually and as couples as poor, intermediate or ideal for each risk factor and...

Exercise Boosts Physical, Mental Well-Being of Older...

23 October 2020
Exercise Boosts Physical, Mental Well-Being of Older Cancer SurvivorsFRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Active older adults -- cancer survivors included -- are in better physical and mental health than their sedentary peers, a new study finds. More regular moderate to vigorous physical activity and less sedentary time improve the mental and physical health of older cancer survivors and older people without a cancer diagnosis, say researchers from the American Cancer Society. "The findings reinforce the importance of moving more and sitting less for both physical and mental health, no matter your age or history of cancer," study co-author Dr. Erika Rees-Punia said. "This is especially relevant now as so many of us, particularly cancer survivors, may be staying home to avoid COVID-19 exposure, and may be feeling a little isolated or down,"...

'Tough Guy' Mentality Keeps Athletes in Denial About Pain

23 October 2020
`Tough Guy` Mentality Keeps Athletes in Denial About PainFRIDAY, Oct. 23, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- A culture of toughness and resilience is encouraged among elite college rowers, but it can keep them from reporting injuries, a new study finds. There's an overall myth among athletes that admitting pain is a sign of weakness and failure, the researchers said. Irish and Australian rowers in this study felt compromised by lower back pain, which is common in the sport, the study authors said. But many felt that the sporting culture didn't allow them to be open and honest about their pain for fear of exclusion. Also, many felt they had to keep competing and training even when in pain. This might have increased the risk of poor outcomes from their pain, and poor emotional and mental experiences they had, according to the report. Rowers who...

Is There a Better Therapy for Hospitalized Anorexia...

20 October 2020
Is There a Better Therapy for Hospitalized Anorexia Patients?TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- It may seem counterintuitive, but when someone with the eating disorder anorexia nervosa is hospitalized, treatment often begins by cutting calories. Now, new research suggests that those eating restrictions can be safely relaxed in the hospital. Starting with a lower-calorie diet has long been thought to prevent big shifts in fluid and electrolytes that can lead to cardiac arrest, coma and even death, said study lead author Andrea Garber. She's chief nutritionist for the University of California, San Francisco's Eating Disorders Program. Though this has been the practice for decades, experts suspected that adding calories might speed recovery. Plus, with current medical technology and lab capabilities, doctors can safely monitor shifts in...

Bringing the Forest to Kids' Daycare May Boost Young Immune Systems

15 October 2020
Bringing the Forest to Kids` Daycare May Boost Young Immune SystemsTHURSDAY, Oct. 15, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Want to give your kids an immune system boost? Try letting them play in the dirt more often, a new study suggests. Researchers in Finland found that when they brought nature into daycare playgrounds -- including forest soil and vegetation -- preschoolers' immune function showed a change for the better. In simple terms, it shifted to a less inflammatory state. That immune system redirect was also accompanied by some changes in the children's microbiome -- the vast collection of bacteria and other microbes that naturally live on and in the body. Research has revealed those bugs to be vital in normal body processes -- from metabolism to brain function to immune system regulation. It's too early to know whether bringing the forest to urban...
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