Latest Fitness News

21Aug
2023

Great Step for Baby: Walkable Neighborhoods Linked to Safer Pregnancies

Great Step for Baby: Walkable Neighborhoods Linked to Safer PregnanciesMONDAY, Aug. 21, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Walkable neighborhoods -- with sidewalks, parks and paths -- encourage pregnant women to get more exercise, which leads to good outcomes for both mom and baby.New research looks at the influence of these walkable communities on this activity, which is considered safe for pregnant women.“Gestational diabetes is a growing issue and low birth weight and preterm babies are always a concern, they can just have so many more complications,” said Karen Conway, a professor at University of New Hampshire Peter T. Paul College of Business and Economics. “At the end of the day, the data shows walkable communities mean mom and the baby are both in better health.”To study this, Conway and co-author Andrea Menclova, associate professor of economics at...

Women With Larger Breasts May Be Less Likely to...

21 August 2023
Women With Larger Breasts May Be Less Likely to Exercise, Study FindsMONDAY, Aug. 21, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Women who have larger breasts tend to exercise less or less intensely, according to a new study that suggests having breast reduction surgery could be a game changer. Australian researchers looking at exercise participation for women in this category called for more accessible, publicly funded breast reduction and other interventions. The study used survey results from nearly 2,000 women who were in the involved in the Parkrun program, which promotes 5K running and walking events. Participants were in Australia, England and South Africa.Women with bigger breasts reported that reducing their breast size would improve their exercise performance and frequency. And among the survey participants, the 56 women who had already undergone breast...

Fit When Young? You May Have a Lower Risk of 9 Cancers...

16 August 2023
Fit When Young? You May Have a Lower Risk of 9 Cancers as You AgeWEDNESDAY, Aug. 16, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Having good fitness while young can really pay off when it comes to cancer risk later in life. New research found that cardiorespiratory fitness -- the ability to do aerobic exercise -- was associated with up to 42% lower risk of nine cancers, including head and neck, esophagus, stomach, pancreas, liver, colon, kidney and lung.Researchers used Swedish registry data up to the end of 2019, covering background information, medical diagnoses and deaths for male conscripts who started their military service between 1968 and 2005.The conscripts were age 16 to 25 when they started their service and had a battery of assessments at that time, including height, weight (body mass index), blood pressure, muscular strength and cardiorespiratory...

What's Your Exercise 'Fat-Burning Zone'?

14 August 2023
What`s Your Exercise `Fat-Burning Zone`?MONDAY, Aug. 14, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- A more personalized approach to exercise may be necessary, claims a new study that found fat burning varied widely between individuals. Even worse, this rate often does not align with the “fat-burning zone” on commercial exercise machines, the researchers added.Clinical exercise testing, a diagnostic procedure to measure a person’s physiological response to exercise, may be a more useful tool, the study authors said.“People with a goal of weight or fat loss may be interested in exercising at the intensity which allows for the maximal rate of fat burning. Most commercial exercise machines offer a ‘fat-burning zone’ option, depending upon age, sex and heart rate,” said lead study author Hannah Kittrell. She is a PhD candidate at...

Playing Football Might Raise Parkinson's Risk

11 August 2023
Playing Football Might Raise Parkinson`s RiskFRIDAY, Aug. 11, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- The link between pro football and the risk for a neurodegenerative disease called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is well known, and now a new study suggests that football may also up the risk for Parkinson’s disease, even among past high school and college players.“Parkinson’s disease has been commonly reported in boxers, but we have not explored this link in great detail in football,” said study author Michael Alosco, an associate professor of neurology at Boston University Chobanian & Avedisian School of Medicine. "This is additional evidence that shows a link between football and later-in-life neurologic problems." The common denominator is likely blows to the head.Parkinsonism is an umbrella term for a group of neurological...
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