Latest Fitness News

17Aug
2022

More Athletes Are Getting Their Nutrition Through an IV. This Should Stop, Experts Say

More Athletes Are Getting Their Nutrition Through an IV. This Should Stop, Experts SayWEDNESDAY, Aug. 17, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Pro athletes appear to be regularly turning to intravenous (IV) nutritional drips to alleviate fatigue and speed recovery, despite the potential risks and without solid proof of any real benefit.Normally, such needle-inserted drips are supposed to be reserved for treating a serious illness like anemia, or in an emergency situation such as severe dehydration.Unless an exemption is granted for medical necessity, the World Anti-Doping Agency limits IV transfusions over 100 mL (3.38 ounces). Without such an exemption, the Olympics bars them.But not all sports leagues have such restrictions, according to an editorial published Aug. 16 in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. And the result has been the rise of pre- or post-game "IV drip bars,"...

Playing Football, Hockey in High School Ups Odds for...

15 August 2022
Playing Football, Hockey in High School Ups Odds for Stimulant AbuseMONDAY, Aug. 15, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Taking part in certain sports in high school may lead to misuse of prescription stimulants in the years after graduation, a new study finds.It reported that high school seniors who play contact sports are 50% more likely to abuse prescription stimulants in their 20s. Seniors who take part in any sport are more likely than those who don't to abuse these drugs, said lead author Philip Veliz, an associate research professor at the University of Michigan School of Nursing.Seniors who participate in noncontact sports are less likely to abuse prescription opioids over the next decade, but more likely to abuse stimulants than nonathletes, the study found."The findings reinforce screening during adolescence as nearly 1 in 3 high school seniors engage...

Race, Income Keeps Many Families From Letting Kids Play...

11 August 2022
Race, Income Keeps Many Families From Letting Kids Play SportsTHURSDAY, Aug. 11, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- American kids who are poor or members of ethnic minority groups are missing out on the youth sports that have long been touted for building strong bodies and strong character, a new study reports.The researchers found that youngsters who are poor, or from Black or Hispanic households, are less likely to take part in organized sports than their white peers.Across the United States, 54% of 6- to 17-year-olds took part in sports in 2020. That included 42% of Black children, 47% of Hispanic youngsters, 51% of Asian children and 60% of white kids, researchers from the U.S. National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) found."These disparities may place some children at risk for poor health during key periods of growth and development," said lead...

Global Warming Will Mean More Unfit, Unhealthy Kids...

8 August 2022
Global Warming Will Mean More Unfit, Unhealthy Kids Worldwide: StudyMONDAY, Aug. 8, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Children are not as physically fit as their parents were when they were kids, and this will likely harm them as the Earth warms, new research claims.The findings are based on a comprehensive review of more than 150 studies that looked at how children maintain physical activity, exercise and cope with heat, as well as how this might change as global temperatures rise. The research was published Aug. 5 in the journal Temperature."Fitter adults are better able to tolerate higher temperatures, due to a combination of physiological, behavioral and psychological factors," said Shawnda Morrison, an environmental exercise physiologist at Slovenia's University of Ljubljana. She is an expert in adaptive and integrative human physiology in extreme...

Getting Young Athletes Ready for a New School Year

7 August 2022
Getting Young Athletes Ready for a New School YearSUNDAY, Aug. 7, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- As a new school year begins, many students return to their favorite sports or try something new.Encouraging kids to make physical activity part of their lives has lifelong benefits, said Dr. Theodore Shybut, assistant professor of orthopedic surgery and sports medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.Shybut offered some tips for getting children ready to start fall sports or any physical activities at any age. His advice comes at a time when many youngsters may be losing interest in organized sports.Shybut recommends giving the youngest kids opportunities to explore many activities to see what they like best. Create an environment in which a child feels encouraged to be active with routine free play at home, family walks or trying out...
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