Latest Men's Health News

24Jul
2019

Health Tip: Giving Medicine Safely to Children

(HealthDay News) -- Giving a child the wrong dose or an inappropriate medication can have serious consequences, says MedlinePlus. Drug labels for prescription medicines should have a section on use among children. To safely give medicine to your child, MedlinePlus suggests: Read and follow the label directions every time. Watch for any side effects. Know the abbreviations for amounts such as tablespoon and teaspoon. Use the correct dosing device. Follow age- and weight-limit restrictions. Check with a doctor before giving two medicines at once.
Testosterone Therapy May Threaten the Heart

Testosterone Therapy May Threaten the Heart

23 July 2019
TUESDAY, July 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Taking testosterone might sound like a good idea for an older man, but a new study suggests the treatment might be bad news for his heart. Men who took it showed a slightly...
TUESDAY, July 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Taking testosterone might sound like a good idea for an older man, but a new study suggests the treatment might be bad news for his heart. Men who took it showed a slightly increased risk of heart attack and stroke in the first few years. "Our findings show that the use of [testosterone therapy] was associated with an increased risk of stroke, TIAs [mini-strokes], or cardiac arrest during the first two years of use," said study author Dr. Christel Renoux. She is from the departments of epidemiology, biostatistics, and occupational health, and the department of neurology and neurosurgery at McGill University in Montreal. "There is limited evidence on the long-term clinical benefits of [testosterone therapy] to effectively treat the modestly...
Parents Who Belittle Their Children May Be Raising Bullies

Parents Who Belittle Their Children May Be Raising Bullies

22 July 2019
MONDAY, July 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's a vicious cycle: Teens who are belittled and demeaned by their parents are more likely to be bullied and to bully others, a new study suggests. "Inappropriate...
MONDAY, July 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's a vicious cycle: Teens who are belittled and demeaned by their parents are more likely to be bullied and to bully others, a new study suggests. "Inappropriate interpersonal responses appear to spread from parents to children, where they spawn peer difficulties," said study co-author Brett Laursen, a professor of psychology at Florida Atlantic University. "Specifically, derisive parenting precipitates a cycle of negative affect and anger between parents and adolescents, which ultimately leads to greater adolescent bullying and victimization," he explained in a university news release. "Our study is important because it provides a more complete understanding of how parents' belittling and critical interactions with adolescents thwart...
'Failure to Launch': Poll Finds Many Older Teens Still...

'Failure to Launch': Poll Finds Many Older Teens Still...

22 July 2019
MONDAY, July 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Sarah Clark was happy to get the call from her college teen, but couldn't believe what she was hearing. "My kid called from college and said, 'I'm sick, what should I do?'"...
MONDAY, July 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Sarah Clark was happy to get the call from her college teen, but couldn't believe what she was hearing. "My kid called from college and said, 'I'm sick, what should I do?'" Clark said. "I'm like, what do you mean what do you do? You have a drug store down the street. Go have at it." A new poll co-directed by Clark found that there are a lot of parents in the same boat. Most parents think they are doing enough to prepare their teens for adulthood, but they're wincing a bit as the time comes for their young to leave the nest, the survey reports. It turns out parents aren't especially confident that their kids are fully prepared to take care of their own money management and health care, said Clark. She is an associate research scientist with...
Plastic Surgery Pays Off for Men
22 July 2019

Plastic Surgery Pays Off for Men

MONDAY, July 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Plastic surgery is no longer the sole domain of women, and men now have even more incentive to try a little nip-and-tuck on their faces: New research suggests they look more attractive and trustworthy to others. The study included 24 men, average age 49 years, who had one or more of the following procedures: upper eyelid lift, reduction of lower eyelids, face-lift, brow-lift, neck-lift, nose reshaping, and/or a chin implant. More than 150 people were asked to look at photos of the men before and after their surgery and rate them on personality (aggressiveness, extroversion, likeability, risk-seeking, sociability, trustworthiness), attractiveness and masculinity. The photos of the men after their procedures scored significantly higher in...
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