Latest Men's Health News

25Nov
2020

When COVID Strikes Cancer Patients, Men Fare Worse

When COVID Strikes Cancer Patients, Men Fare WorseWEDNESDAY, Nov. 25, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Men with COVID-19 and cancer run a greater risk for severe symptoms and death than women with both conditions, a new study finds.Researchers concluded that male cancer patients are 60% more likely to have severe COVID-19 and even die from it than women."Knowing this propensity for poorer outcomes in males with COVID-19 and cancer will help physicians make better decisions in caring for them in clinical settings," said study author Dr. Anup Kasi, an assistant professor of oncology at the University of Kansas Medical Center.Other studies had noted a higher death rate for men who developed COVID-19. The research team wondered if such gender differences would also apply to cancer patients. "We didn't know if the same gender differences in...

More Kids Injured by Tiny Magnets After Sales Ban Was...

24 November 2020
More Kids Injured by Tiny Magnets After Sales Ban Was Lifted: StudyTUESDAY, Nov. 24, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Small, powerful magnets in toys like Buckyballs building sets and jewelry kits are causing an alarming number of serious pediatric injuries in the United States, new research warns.Analyzing national data, researchers found an 80% rise in these injuries to children from 2016 to 2019, following the repeal of a sales ban on the magnets by a federal court.When these small rare earth magnets are swallowed, the potential for serious gastrointestinal injury is high, noted study lead author Dr. Michael Flaherty.Cases are popping up all over the United States, according to a recent report from NBC News. In Indiana, a 4-year-old boy was rushed to surgery after swallowing 27 magnetized balls; one 2-year-old girl in Illinois needed her appendix removed...

Does Parents' Nagging Kids About Screen Time Even Matter?

23 November 2020
Does Parents` Nagging Kids About Screen Time Even Matter?MONDAY, Nov. 23, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Parents' constant refrain, telling their teens to turn off the TV, stop playing video games or put down the cellphone, may not be necessary.And new research suggests those worried about their kids becoming addicted to technology may even be able to breathe a sigh of relief.The amount of time young people spend on technology -- and parental limits on that time -- had no lasting effect on technology use by young adults, according to a new study."We think that parenting does matter, but not for how much you're using technology," said lead author Stefanie Mollborn, a professor of sociology at the Institute of Behavioral Science at University of Colorado, Boulder. "It matters more for things like how you feel about your technology use. Do you feel...

Parents' Age Key to Whether Kids Get Vaccinated Against...

23 November 2020
Parents` Age Key to Whether Kids Get Vaccinated Against COVID, Study FindsMONDAY, Nov. 23, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- As scientists worked on COVID-19 vaccines, other researchers were addressing a question: Once shots are available, will parents vaccinate their kids against the new coronavirus?The answer: Younger parents are much less likely than older ones to plan to vaccinate their children and themselves against COVID-19."Parents' willingness to vaccinate themselves and their children against COVID-19 will be vital to preventing community-wide spread of coronavirus, once a vaccine becomes available," said study lead author Dr. Matthew Davis. He is chair of pediatrics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. "If COVID-19 vaccines are approved for use in children, vaccinating youth may be integral to reducing the transmission risk of...

'Hidden' Prostate Cancer on Biopsy Usually Means Good Outcome: Study

23 November 2020
`Hidden` Prostate Cancer on Biopsy Usually Means Good Outcome: StudyMONDAY, Nov. 23, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Negative biopsies among early-stage prostate cancer patients who've chosen active surveillance are associated with a low risk of disease progression, but they aren't a sign that their cancer has completely vanished, a new study indicates.Active surveillance refers to close monitoring for signs of cancer progression -- what's often called "watchful waiting." Patients sometimes get regular prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing, prostate exams, imaging and repeat biopsies.The objective of active surveillance is to avoid or delay treatment and its side effects without putting patients at risk of cancer progression and death.Sometimes, active surveillance patients have negative biopsies that show no evidence of prostate cancer. While some of...
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