Latest Men's Health News

24Sep
2021

New Tricks to Turn Your Fussy Eater Around

New Tricks to Turn Your Fussy Eater AroundFRIDAY, Sept. 24, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- If your children are picky eaters, bribing or pressuring them will probably backfire. But there are other steps you can take to help them get over their fussiness, researchers report.Australian scientists reviewed 80 studies to find out more about fussy eaters. They found that pressuring a child to eat, offering rewards for eating and stricter parenting methods didn't help. But a relaxed parenting style, eating together as a family and involving children in preparing food can reduce the odds of fussy eating."For parents with a fussy eater, mealtimes can be especially stressful -- juggling the family meal and a picky eater is no small feat," said researcher Laine Chilman, a PhD student at the University of the Sunshine Coast in Australia."Some...

Could Your Genes Be to Blame for Your Kid's Aversion to...

23 September 2021
Could Your Genes Be to Blame for Your Kid`s Aversion to Broccoli?THURSDAY, Sept. 23, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Parents and their children often share numerous traits -- including a dislike for broccoli and other veggies in the same family.Noxious enzymes from bacteria in saliva may be the reason why, a new study suggests.Levels of these compounds are similar in parents and children, which might be why these vegetables are turnoffs for both generations, especially when the levels are high, researchers said.Besides broccoli, this Brassica group includes cauliflower, cabbage and Brussels sprouts.Brassica veggies offload a compound -- called S-methyl-ÊŸ-cysteine sulfoxide -- that produces potent, sulfurous odors that can result in bacteria in some folks' mouths, researchers noted. For the study, published Sept. 22 in the Journal of Agricultural and Food...

Common Hormone Disorder in Women Costs U.S. $8 Billion a...

23 September 2021
Common Hormone Disorder in Women Costs U.S. $8 Billion a YearTHURSDAY, Sept. 23, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Treating polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) — the most common hormone disorder in women of child-bearing age — is costly.In 2020, diagnosing and treating this disorder cost an estimated $8 billion in the United States, according to a new economic analysis.PCOS disrupts metabolism, and causes irregular menstrual periods and elevated testosterone levels. It affects between 5% and 20% of U.S. women of reproductive age. PCOS is a leading cause of infertility and is associated with obesity, diabetes and heart disease."Although PCOS affects at least one in seven women and leads to over $8 billion in health care costs annually in the United States alone, it is frequently misunderstood or overlooked by clinicians and policymakers," said study...

Childhood Trauma Linked With Higher Odds for Adult...

23 September 2021
Childhood Trauma Linked With Higher Odds for Adult Neurological IllsTHURSDAY, Sept. 23, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Kids who suffer abuse, neglect or household dysfunction are more likely to have neurological problems like stroke or headaches as adults, researchers report. "Traumatic events in childhood have been linked in previous studies to a higher risk of heart disease, diabetes, riskier health behaviors like smoking and drug use, and decreased life expectancy," said researcher Dr. Adys Mendizabal, of the University of California, Los Angeles. "They have also been linked to a higher risk of headaches, but for many other neurologic conditions, little is known. Our study found that people with neurologic conditions like stroke, headache and epilepsy were more likely to have experienced abuse, neglect, or household dysfunction as children when compared...

Witnessing Abuse of a Sibling Can Traumatize a Child

22 September 2021
Witnessing Abuse of a Sibling Can Traumatize a ChildWEDNESDAY, Sept. 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Seeing a parent abuse a sibling can be as traumatizing as watching a parent hurt another parent, a new study finds. And it can lead to depression, anxiety and anger, researchers say."When we hear about exposure to family violence, we usually think about someone being the victim of direct physical abuse or witnessing spousal assault," said researcher Corinna Tucker. She is a professor of human development and family studies at the University of New Hampshire, in Durham, N.H."But many children witness abuse of a sibling without being a direct victim and it turns out we should be thinking more about these dynamics when we tally the effects of family violence exposure," Tucker said in a university news release.For the study, the researchers...
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