Latest Men's Health News

24Jan
2023

AHA News: A Thump to His Chest During a Game Stopped His Heart. Textbook Response Saved Him.

AHA News: A Thump to His Chest During a Game Stopped His Heart. Textbook Response Saved Him.TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2023 (American Heart Association News) -- On April 16, 2021, Peter Laake was a starting freshman defender for his prep school's varsity lacrosse team. He'd had a good year, and now his team was playing a key rival on home turf in Towson, Maryland, a Baltimore suburb.The first quarter was nearing an end when the ball walloped Peter's chest. Sitting in the stands, his mother heard the ball's impact, then watched her son take a few steps. "I saw his legs kind of flop in the air," said Carron Laake.Peter turned to see where the ball went. "Then I got dizzy."He collapsed face-first.Jeremy Parr, the school's head athletic trainer, was among the first to reach Peter. He thought Peter had suffered an abdominal injury or had the wind knocked out of him. Then he saw that...

As Opioid Deaths Rise Among Teens, Too Few Youth Get...

24 January 2023
As Opioid Deaths Rise Among Teens, Too Few Youth Get Anti-Addiction DrugTUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- The number of American teenagers becoming addicted to opioids is on the rise, yet fewer are being prescribed a medication that can help them, a new government study finds.Between 2015 and 2020, the proportion of teens receiving buprenorphine prescriptions fell by 45%. Buprenorphine is one of three medications approved to treat opioid addiction.The decline in prescriptions is "concerning," given that the opioid crisis is actually worsening, said lead researcher Dr. Andrew Terranella, of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention."In the context of rising rates of opioid-involved overdose deaths, these data really underscore the important work that still needs to be done to better understand the reasons for low prescribing," he said.The...

Your Weight Could Alter Vitamin D's Effect on Health

24 January 2023
Your Weight Could Alter Vitamin D`s Effect on HealthTUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D is widely promoted for better health, but if you're overweight, you might not reap the benefits.In a new study, researchers found a 30% to 40% reduction in cancer, cancer deaths and autoimmune diseases among people with a lower body mass index (BMI) who took vitamin D supplements, but only a small benefit among those with higher BMIs."Patients with obesity, despite taking the same amount of supplement, had a lower response," said lead researcher Deirdre Tobias, an assistant professor in the department of nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health, in Boston.The cutoff was a BMI of less than 25, which is considered a healthy weight, the study authors noted. It's not known why being overweight or obese affects levels of the...

Could UV Light From Nail Polish Dryers Cause Cancer?

24 January 2023
Could UV Light From Nail Polish Dryers Cause Cancer?TUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Getting a gel manicure may be less safe than many think.Researchers say the nail polish dryers that use ultraviolet (UV) light to cure the gel polish emit possibly dangerous rays. These rays might lead to cell death and cancer-causing mutations in human cells, they noted.Maria Zhivagui, a researcher at the University of California, San Diego, has sworn off gel manicures after seeing results in the lab.When she was doing her PhD, she was intrigued by gel manicures, which last longer than normal polish. "I started using gel manicures periodically for several years," Zhivagui said in a university news release. However, "once I saw the effect of radiation emitted by the gel polish drying device on cell death and that it actually mutates cells...

Research Gives Clues to Why Cancer in One Breast Could Develop in the Other

24 January 2023
Research Gives Clues to Why Cancer in One Breast Could Develop in the OtherTUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Some women with cancer in one breast may have a greater risk of developing cancer in the other breast, new research suggests.Those who carry a specific genetic change — a germline BRCA1, BRCA2 or CHEK2 mutation — have at least a twofold increased risk of cancer in both breasts, also called contralateral breast cancer, according to researchers at the Mayo Clinic Comprehensive Cancer Center in Rochester, Minn. The study of 15,000 women also found that those with germline ATM mutations did not have a significantly elevated risk of cancer in both breasts.For some carriers of the PALB2 gene, the risk was dependent on other factors. They had a significantly elevated risk of cancer in both breasts if they had estrogen receptor-negative disease,...
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