Latest Men's Health News

22Sep
2021

Parents of Hospitalized Kids Need More Info on Costs: Study

Parents of Hospitalized Kids Need More Info on Costs: StudyWEDNESDAY, Sept. 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Having a child in the hospital is distressing for families, and not knowing what that stay might cost can add to that stress, researchers say.A new study has found that three-quarters of U.S. families want to have conversations about the costs of care. Yet only 7% of families actually have had this financial counseling with hospital staff. The research suggests that patients and their families need better access to a hospital's financial counselors, the study authors said. "Part of what we hope this paper will do is to serve as a wake-up call to say, 'We have to figure out a way to make the anticipated total cost of care much more transparent to patients,'" said study co-author Dr. Hannah Bassett. She is a clinical assistant professor of...

Intervening in Infancy Might Help Prevent Some Cases of...

21 September 2021
Intervening in Infancy Might Help Prevent Some Cases of Autism: StudyWEDNESDAY, Sept. 22, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Infants may show early signs of autism, but a diagnosis usually isn't made until age 3. Now, a new study suggests that jumpstarting therapy might stave off that diagnosis altogether.Researchers say their preemptive, parent-led intervention could have a significant impact on children's social development and longer-term disabilities."What we found is that the babies who received our therapy had reduced behaviors that we use to diagnose autism. And, in fact, the therapy was so effective in supporting their development, that the babies who had received the therapy were less likely to meet clinical criteria for autism," said study author Andrew Whitehouse. He's a professor of autism research at Telethon Kids Institute and the University of...

Pandemic Changed Families' Eating Habits, for Good and...

21 September 2021
Pandemic Changed Families` Eating Habits, for Good and Bad: PollTUESDAY, Sept. 21, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Over the past year and a half, the coronavirus pandemic has remade so much of everyday life, including the foods families eat.In many families, that's been a good thing, with half cooking at home more often and two-thirds making healthier food choices, according to a nationwide poll of U.S. parents. For about 20% of parents, many of whom said they felt stressed-out and busy, the pandemic lifestyle has meant picking up fast food more often, however."Children's nutrition is really important and there's been a lot of disruption in kids' lives and in the lives of families," said pediatrician Dr. Gary Freed, co-director of the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health. "We wanted to get a better sense of how that plays out...

What Helps Your Heart More, Losing Fat or Gaining Muscle?

17 September 2021
What Helps Your Heart More, Losing Fat or Gaining Muscle?FRIDAY, Sept. 17, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Shedding excess weight does much more for the long-term heart health of young people than building muscle, new research suggests.It's not that gaining muscle while young proved to be a cardiovascular problem. It's just that losing fat offered bigger heart benefits. "We absolutely still encourage exercise," said study lead author Joshua Bell, a senior research associate in epidemiology at the University of Bristol in England. "There are many other health benefits, and strength is a prize in itself," he said. "We may just need to temper expectations for what gaining muscle can really do for avoiding heart disease. Fat gain is the real driver."The study followed more than 3,200 Brits born in the 1990s. It found those who had primarily lost fat...

9/11 First Responders Face Higher Cancer Risk 20 Years Later

13 September 2021
9/11 First Responders Face Higher Cancer Risk 20 Years LaterMONDAY, Sept. 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Twenty years on, responders to the World Trade Center attacks in New York City are showing increased risks of certain cancers, two new studies confirm.Researchers found higher-than-average rates of prostate cancer among firefighters, medics and other workers who toiled at the disaster site on and after Sept. 11, 2001.And compared with firefighters from other major U.S. cities, those exposed to the 9/11 disaster had higher risks of both prostate and thyroid cancers.It's been known that World Trade Center rescue and recovery workers have above-average rates of certain cancers.But the new studies help clarify the picture further, experts said.In one, researchers found that increased risks of prostate cancer began showing up surprisingly early —...
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