Latest Nutrition News

13Dec
2022

Formula Feeding Raises Odds for Anemia in Very 'Preemie' Babies

Formula Feeding Raises Odds for Anemia in Very `Preemie` BabiesTUESDAY, Dec. 13, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Babies born prematurely who are fed formula may need iron supplementation like their breastfed counterparts, new research suggests. “Just because a baby is on iron-rich formula, we should not assume all of their iron needs are being met, since iron from the formula may not have the same absorption as iron from breast milk,” said researcher Grace Power. She is a third-year medical student at Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia, Canada. “These findings suggest we might need to rethink some of the guidelines for iron supplementation,” she said in a news release from the American Society of Hematology.Currently, the Canadian Pediatric Society recommends iron supplementation for breastfed preterm babies, but not for those fed formula...

Cats Now Have an FDA-Approved Pill to Treat Their Diabetes

9 December 2022
Cats Now Have an FDA-Approved Pill to Treat Their DiabetesFRIDAY, Dec. 9, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Owners whose cats have diabetes now have a new option to care for the condition in their otherwise healthy pets. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Thursday approved the first pill to improve control of diabetes in some cats. The drug, called Bexacat (bexagliflozin tablets), is not insulin and is not meant for cats who have the type of diabetes that requires treatment with insulin. Rather, it is what is called a sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor.The active ingredient in this pill prevents the cat's kidneys from reabsorbing glucose into the blood. This excess glucose leaves the body through the urine, lowering blood sugar levels.As part of the approval, the FDA requires that Bexacat labels include a boxed warning about the...

FDA OKs Bivalent COVID Boosters for Kids 6 Months and Older

8 December 2022
FDA OKs Bivalent COVID Boosters for Kids 6 Months and OlderTHURSDAY, Dec. 8, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The updated bivalent COVID-19 boosters are now approved for use in children as young as 6 months of age, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today.Children can receive either a Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech bivalent booster shot, although the rules differ depending on their age and what type of vaccine they got as their primary series, the FDA said.Kids 6 months to 5 years who received the original Moderna vaccine can receive the Moderna booster at least two months after completing their first round of shots.Children 5 and older also can receive the Pfizer-BioNTech booster at least two months after they've completed their first series of COVID shots.The new Pfizer-BioNTech booster will replace the third dose of the primary series of...

Vitamin D Might Help Shield the Aging Brain

8 December 2022
Vitamin D Might Help Shield the Aging BrainTHURSDAY, Dec. 8, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults who harbor more vitamin D in their brains may stay mentally sharper, a new study suggests.Researchers found that when older adults had higher levels of vitamin D in their brain tissue, they tended to perform better on standard tests of memory and thinking. They were also less likely to have dementia or milder cognitive impairments.Experts stressed that the study does not prove that vitamin D, itself, protects against dementia -- a complex brain disease that has many contributors. And no one should start downing supplements based on the findings, they said.For one, too much vitamin D can be harmful. And the study did not assess how much vitamin D participants were actually getting day to day."We have no evidence that getting more...

Lasik Surgery Should Carry Warnings of Possible Complications, FDA Says

8 December 2022
Lasik Surgery Should Carry Warnings of Possible Complications, FDA SaysTHURSDAY, Dec. 8, 2022 (HealthDay News) – Lasik eye surgery is a common vision-correcting procedure that many Americans view as safe and effective, but the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has now drafted guidance that warns of potential complications.Although many patients are happy with the results after surgery, the recommended new guidance says complications can include dry eyes, double vision, difficulty with night driving and, in rare cases, chronic eye pain. Even after surgery, some patients will still need eyeglasses.The draft also notes that certain types of patients may be at higher risk of problems, including people with chronic conditions such as diabetes and those who take certain medications, the New York Times reported.Since the recommendations were first released...
RSS
First567810121314Last
HealthDay

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.