Latest Senior Health News

26Jan
2023

Heart Disease When Young Could Bring Memory Issues by Middle Age

Heart Disease When Young Could Bring Memory Issues by Middle AgeTHURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- People who suffer a heart attack or stroke in middle age may develop memory and thinking problems earlier in life, too, a new study finds.The study, published online Jan. 25 in the journal Neurology, focused on people who had developed premature cardiovascular disease. That refers to heart disease, stroke or leg artery disease that strikes before the age of 60.The researchers found that those individuals generally performed worse on tests of memory and thinking compared to people their age who were free of cardiovascular conditions. And the differences were already apparent in middle age.It's not clear what that could ultimately mean for their brain health down the road, said lead researcher Dr. Xiaqing Jiang of the University of California,...

Home Workouts Help Your Brain, But Group Exercise May Be...

26 January 2023
Home Workouts Help Your Brain, But Group Exercise May Be Even BetterTHURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- A good physical workout benefits an older brain. So does socializing. Put those two together and the payoff may be even bigger.Researchers in Japan found that link in a new study that looked at exercising solo and in a group."Exercise is manageable for many older people, and we saw cognitive benefits from it compared with those who don't exercise," said study senior author Tomohiro Okura, a professor at the University of Tsukuba in Japan. "But it's even more noteworthy that we found exercise's benefits rise — 14.1 percentage points in our study — when performed with others and at least twice a week," Okura added in a university news release.Starting in 2017, the study collected data on nearly 4,400 older adults for four years in a city 62...

Women, Keep Moving to Help Keep Mental Decline at Bay

26 January 2023
Women, Keep Moving to Help Keep Mental Decline at BayTHURSDAY, Jan. 26, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- A lot of people wear watches that count their every step as they try to move more. Now, a new study finds that getting more of those steps each day, along with moderate-to-vigorous physical exercise, could cut the risk of dementia and thinking impairments for women.For women aged 65 or older, each additional 31 minutes per day of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity was associated with a 21% lower risk of developing mild cognitive (thinking) impairment or dementia, according to the study led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). The risk was 33% lower with each additional 1,865 daily steps.“Given that the onset of dementia begins 20 years or more before symptoms show, early intervention for delaying or...

Initial Symptoms Could Predict How Fast Alzheimer's...

25 January 2023
Initial Symptoms Could Predict How Fast Alzheimer`s ProgressesWEDNESDAY, Jan. 25, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Memory loss is the most common symptom associated with Alzheimer’s disease — the terrifying prospect of slowly forgetting yourself and everything around you.But people who exhibit memory loss early on in their dementia actually have a slower rate of decline than those who develop other symptoms earlier, a new study reports.Difficulty forming sentences, making plans, solving problems or judging space and distance — these symptoms all herald a steeper and faster decline for Alzheimer’s and dementia patients than do early memory problems, researchers found.“People with memory changes in fact have a slightly slower rate of disease progression than people who have other symptoms, like language or judgment issues, in terms of their...

Even Light Exercise Can Help Arthritic Knees

24 January 2023
Even Light Exercise Can Help Arthritic KneesTUESDAY, Jan. 24, 2023 (HealthDay News) -- Even short bouts of light exercise can help the millions of people with knee osteoarthritis reduce pain and improve their range of motion.Knee osteoarthritis, the wear-and-tear form of the disease, occurs when the cartilage between your bones breaks down, causing pain, stiffness and swelling.Researchers in a new study compared high-dose and low-dose exercise in 189 people with knee osteoarthritis. Everyone exercised three times a week for 12 weeks. Exercises included indoor cycling and various lower body exercises such as de-loaded squats and knee extensions. De-loaded exercises use bands or pulleys to take weight off the knee joint and minimize pain.Folks in the high-dose group performed 11 exercises in 60- to 90-minute sessions. Folks in the...
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