Latest Senior Health News

1Dec
2022

The 'Great Resignation' Is Taking a Toll on U.S. Health Care

The `Great Resignation` Is Taking a Toll on U.S. Health CareTHURSDAY, Dec. 1, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The nationwide shortage of health care professionals -- a so-called "Great Resignation" of providers -- is impacting patient care in ways large and small, a new HealthDay/Harris Poll shows.One in four Americans (25%) have noticed or personally experienced the impact of staffing shortages in health care, second only to staff shortages in the retail sector (35%), the poll found.Further, more than two in three (68%) of people who needed health care during the past six months experienced delays or challenges in getting the care they need.More than half (57%) blamed staffing shortages for the lack of care, and experts told HealthDay Now that these folks aren't wrong.Nurses, doctors and other health care workers are burned out after three years of...

Fatal Drug Overdoses Among U.S. Seniors Have Tripled...

30 November 2022
Fatal Drug Overdoses Among U.S. Seniors Have Tripled Since 2000WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Growing numbers of older Americans are dying from drug overdoses and alcohol abuse.That's the tragic takeaway from two new reports by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.More than 5,000 people aged 65 and older in the United States died of a drug overdose in 2020, and this number has tripled since 2000, according to one of the reports.The other report revealed that more than 11,600 U.S. seniors died from alcohol-induced causes in 2020. Alcohol-induced death rates in this age group have been on the rise since 2011 and jumped more than 18% from 2019 to 2020.The new research wasn’t designed to look at why more older Americans are dying from drug overdoses or alcohol abuse, but the findings mirror what has been seen in younger...

Experimental Alzheimer's Drug May Slow Decline, But...

30 November 2022
Experimental Alzheimer`s Drug May Slow Decline, But Safety Concerns LingerWEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The experimental Alzheimer's drug lecanemab slowed thinking declines among patients suffering the early stages of the disease in a new study, but safety concerns about brain swelling and brain bleeds remain.In the eagerly awaited trial findings, published Tuesday in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers reported that lecanemab “reduced brain amyloid levels and was associated with moderately less decline on clinical measures of cognition and function than placebo at 18 months, but was associated with adverse events."The bottom line, according to the researchers: "Longer trials are warranted to determine the efficacy and safety of lecanemab in early Alzheimer’s disease.”Exactly how much difference did the drug, made by Eisai...

Do Steroid Injections Worsen Arthritic Knees?

30 November 2022
Do Steroid Injections Worsen Arthritic Knees?WEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Corticosteroid injections to relieve pain in patients with knee osteoarthritis could actually be setting them back.Two new studies have discovered that, despite the temporary relief of symptoms, the injections were associated with continued progression of the disease.On the other hand, patients injected with another symptom reliever, hyaluronic acid, saw decreased progression of their knee osteoarthritis.The findings were presented Tuesday at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), in Chicago. Research presented at medical meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.“While both corticosteroid and hyaluronic acid injections are reported to help with symptomatic pain...

Many U.S. Seniors Get Needless, Pricey Cervical Cancer Screenings

30 November 2022
Many U.S. Seniors Get Needless, Pricey Cervical Cancer ScreeningsWEDNESDAY, Nov. 30, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers warn that high rates of cervical cancer screening in women over 65 suggest that some older Americans are being unnecessarily screened.More health data on these screenings in older women is needed to prevent potential harm and unnecessary costs, said the team from University of Illinois Chicago (UIC), University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.The team analyzed cervical cancer screenings in women over age 65 using Medicare claims data from 1999 to 2019. In 2019, more than 1.3 million women over 65 had received a Pap test, colposcopy or other cervical procedure, at a total cost of $83 million.“Cervical cancer screening and other preventive services are among our most...
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