Latest Senior Health News

5May
2022

Adding These Foods to Your Diet Could Keep Dementia Away

Adding These Foods to Your Diet Could Keep Dementia AwayTHURSDAY, May 5, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- A diet rich in the antioxidants that leafy, green vegetables and colorful fruit deliver is good for your body, and now new research shows it also protects your brain.In the study, people whose blood contained the highest amounts of three key antioxidants were less likely to develop all-cause dementia than those whose blood had lower levels of these nutrients. "The takeaway is that a healthy diet rich in antioxidants from dark leafy greens and orange-pigmented fruits with or without antioxidant supplements may reduce the risk of developing dementia," said Dr. Luigi Ferrucci, scientific director for the U.S. National Institute on Aging (NIA), which funded the study. "But the only way to prove the connection between antioxidants and brain health...

Alzheimer's Research Casts Doubt on Safety of Popular...

4 May 2022
Alzheimer`s Research Casts Doubt on Safety of Popular Brain SupplementsWEDNESDAY, May 4, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- A dietary supplement believed to protect against Alzheimer's disease might instead be potentially harmful to the brain, a new study warns.L-serine is an amino acid that serves many different roles in the body, and one is to influence the development and function of synapses in the brain.Clinical trials are underway to test serine supplements in older adults experiencing cognitive decline, researchers said, based on the thought that a lack of serine might fuel development of dementia and Alzheimer's disease.But new findings suggest the opposite is true -- elevated serine levels might instead contribute to Alzheimer's disease, researchers reported May 3 in the journal Cell Metabolism."We are trying to say, be cautious," said lead researcher Xu...

Scientists Calculate Perfect Amount of Sleep for Folks...

3 May 2022
Scientists Calculate Perfect Amount of Sleep for Folks Over 40 TUESDAY, May 3, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Are you over 40 and wonder what the magic amount of sleep every night might be? A new study arrives at an answer.It turns out that seven hours of sleep a night may be the ideal amount for keeping your brain in good health if you're middle-aged or older."Getting a good night's sleep is important at all stages of life, but particularly as we age. Finding ways to improve sleep for older people could be crucial to helping them maintain good mental health and well-being and avoiding cognitive decline, particularly for patients with psychiatric disorders and dementias," said study author Barbara Sahakian, from the University of Cambridge's department of psychiatry, in England.For the study, the investigators analyzed data on sleep patterns, mental...

Medicare Advantage Plans Often Deny Coverage for...

28 April 2022
Medicare Advantage Plans Often Deny Coverage for Eligible, Necessary Care: ReportTHURSDAY, April 28, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Coverage for eligible, necessary care is denied each year to tens of thousands of seniors with private Medicare Advantage plans, U.S. federal investigators say.In a report released Thursday, the team from the inspector general's office of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said Medicare needs to improve oversight of these plans and strengthen enforcement against those private insurance companies with a pattern of improper denials of coverage.About 28 million older people have Medicare Advantage plans, which offer privatized versions of Medicare that are often cheaper and provide a greater range of benefits than the traditional government program.But the HHS findings challenge claims by the industry's main trade group that...

U.S. Task Force Rejects Daily Aspirin for Heart Health in People Over 60

26 April 2022
U.S. Task Force Rejects Daily Aspirin for Heart Health in People Over 60TUESDAY, April 26, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- It seemed a simple prospect — take a low-dose baby aspirin tablet once a day and reduce your risk of ever suffering a heart attack or stroke.But new science has shown it's not that simple.Noting the drug's risk of dangerous bleeding, the nation's leading panel of preventive health experts has reversed course and now recommends that most people not start taking daily low-dose aspirin to prevent their first heart attack or stroke.The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) updated its guidelines Tuesday to recommend against initiating daily low-dose aspirin in people 60 and older.The choice for people between 40 and 59 would be between themselves and their doctor, but the task force warns that the "net benefit of aspirin use in this...
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