Latest Senior Health News

14Sep
2021

Trouble Concentrating at Work? Your Office Air May Be to Blame

Trouble Concentrating at Work? Your Office Air May Be to BlameTUESDAY, Sept. 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- It's fair to say most bosses want their employees to have high productivity.Unfortunately, the air that office workers breathe may put a damper on quick thinking and fast work. A new study found increased concentrations of fine particulate matter, called PM2.5, and lower ventilation rates were linked to slower response times and reduced accuracy."PM2.5 is a very nasty pollutant. It can account for 9 million deaths globally," said lead author Jose Guillermo Cedeno Laurent, a research fellow in the environmental health department at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.Cedeno Laurent said PM2.5 concentrations are already associated with neurodegenerative decline such as in Alzheimer's disease, dementia and Parkinson's disease, but those...

Most Older Americans Believe Health Care Workers Should...

14 September 2021
Most Older Americans Believe Health Care Workers Should Be Vaccinated: PollTUESDAY, Sept. 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Eight in 10 older Americans think health care workers should be vaccinated against COVID-19, according to a new poll.Among 50- to 80-year-olds, 61% of respondents said the vaccine should be required for all health care workers. Another 19% said vaccination should probably be required. The remaining 20% oppose mandatory vaccination, the findings showed.The results are from a nationwide poll taken in August prior to a federal push to require vaccinations for nearly all health care workers whose employers accept Medicare and Medicaid — an estimated 17 million people."As our country tries to get the coronavirus under control, it's important that health care employers and health providers hear the voices of those who are most likely to turn to...

Most Alzheimer's Patients Wouldn't Have Qualified for...

14 September 2021
Most Alzheimer`s Patients Wouldn`t Have Qualified for Controversial Drug`s Trial: StudyTUESDAY, Sept. 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. approval of the Alzheimer's drug Aduhelm is already mired in controversy. Now a new study finds that most Alzheimer's patients could not have taken part in clinical trials that led to the green light.In June, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration gave accelerated approval to Aduhelm (aducanumab) for treating patients with mild cognitive impairment or mild dementia from Alzheimer's disease. The decision quickly came under fire because of the Biogen drug's high price -- $56,000 a year -- and questions about possible collaboration between regulators and the drug's maker.Now, this new study points to other limitations. The phase 3 trials of the drug showed an increased risk of certain adverse vascular events. Although the trials excluded...

Diets That Lower Brain Iron Could Keep You Sharp

13 September 2021
Diets That Lower Brain Iron Could Keep You SharpMONDAY, Sept. 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults who regularly eat foods like fish, nuts and olive oil may have less iron accumulation in their brains, as well as sharper memories, a small study suggests.The brain requires a certain level of iron to function normally, but the aging brain can accumulate an excess amount. And that excess iron has been linked to cognitive decline — a slow deterioration in memory and thinking skills that can lead to dementia.It's not yet clear that the extra iron actually causes mental decline, or that limiting its buildup will stave off dementia, said Valentinos Zachariou, the lead researcher on the new study.But diet stands as one potential way to do that, said Zachariou, a neuroscience researcher at the University of Kentucky, in Lexington.His...

New Tally Adds Extra 16,000 U.S. Nursing Home Residents Lost to COVID

10 September 2021
New Tally Adds Extra 16,000 U.S. Nursing Home Residents Lost to COVIDFRIDAY, Sept. 10, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The number of cases and deaths from COVID-19 in U.S. nursing homes appears to have been grossly underestimated.According to a new study, that's because U.S. federal guidelines did not require nursing homes to report cases and deaths until May 24, 2020, months after the pandemic began."Because of the delay in the federal reporting system for cases and deaths in nursing homes, there were roughly 68,000 unreported cases and 16,000 unreported deaths from COVID-19 in the early months of the pandemic," said lead researcher Karen Shen, an applied public and labor economist at Harvard University."Accounting for underreporting changes the understanding of the toll on nursing homes across places and across facilities," she added.For instance, using the...
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