Latest Senior Health News

Do NFL Players Face a Higher Risk of Early Death? 1Feb
2018

Do NFL Players Face a Higher Risk of Early Death?

THURSDAY, Feb. 1, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- The Philadelphia Eagles and New England Patriots playing in Sunday's Super Bowl may have already taken a hidden hit before setting foot on the field, a new study...
Cancer Survival Rates Vary Across the World

Cancer Survival Rates Vary Across the World

31 January 2018
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 31, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer survival rates are improving worldwide, but poorer countries are seeing less improvement than wealthier ones, a new study shows. Researchers analyzed data from...
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 31, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer survival rates are improving worldwide, but poorer countries are seeing less improvement than wealthier ones, a new study shows. Researchers analyzed data from 2000 to 2014 to assess five-year cancer survival rates among 37.5 million children and adults diagnosed with one of 18 common cancers. These patients were from 71 countries and territories. After taking into account a number of factors, the investigators found that survival for most of the cancers included in the study has been consistently high over the last 15 years in the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Finland, Norway, Iceland and Sweden. But poorer nations have seen fewer gains. For example, among women diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States...
Concussions Tied to Rise in Dementia Risk Decades Later

Concussions Tied to Rise in Dementia Risk Decades Later

30 January 2018
TUESDAY, Jan. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A serious head injury may increase the risk for dementia even decades later, a new, large study suggests. A traumatic injury to the brain -- such as a concussion from a...
TUESDAY, Jan. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- A serious head injury may increase the risk for dementia even decades later, a new, large study suggests. A traumatic injury to the brain -- such as a concussion from a sports collision or a motor vehicle accident -- is already associated with short-term risk of dementia. But the new research finds that, although the risk decreases over time, it still continues for many years. "The main finding is the strong association between a previous traumatic brain injury and the risk of dementia," said the study's senior author, Peter Nordstrom. "The association is stronger for more severe or multiple traumatic brain injuries, and the association persists for more than 30 years after the trauma," added Nordstrom, a professor of geriatric medicine...
Brain 'Pacemaker' Might Help Slow Alzheimer's

Brain 'Pacemaker' Might Help Slow Alzheimer's

30 January 2018
TUESDAY, Jan. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Stimulating the brain with an implantable device may be safe -- and possibly helpful -- for some people with Alzheimer's disease, a small pilot study suggests. In what...
TUESDAY, Jan. 30, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Stimulating the brain with an implantable device may be safe -- and possibly helpful -- for some people with Alzheimer's disease, a small pilot study suggests. In what researchers described as a "proof of concept" treatment, three Alzheimer's patients had deep brain stimulation (DBS) wires implanted in the brain -- in areas related to skills like planning, judgment and problem-solving. Over the next 18 months or more, the tactic appeared to be safe. And there were "signals" that it was slowing down two of the patients' decline, said lead researcher Dr. Douglas Scharre, director of cognitive neurology at Ohio State University's Wexner Medical Center. Deep brain stimulation is already used to treat some cases of Parkinson's disease and...

Health Tip: Prevent Hypothermia Among Seniors

30 January 2018
(HealthDay News) -- Seniors are at heightened risk of hypothermia, the medical term for low body temperature. Older adults lose body heat faster than when they were younger, the U.S. National Institute on Aging says. Hypothermia occurs when a person's body temperature drops to 95 degrees Fahrenheit or lower. Typical warning signs include slowed or slurred speech, sleepiness or confusion, shivering or stiffness in the arms and legs, poor control over body movements, slow reactions or a weak pulse. The agency suggests how to prevent hypothermia in older adults: Some prescription and over-the-counter meds may increase your risk for hypothermia. Ask your doctor if this pertains to you. Set your home's thermostat to at least 68 degrees. To stay warm at home, wear long underwear under...
RSS
First136137138139141143144145Last

Theme picker

HealthDay

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.