Latest Senior Health News

17Jan
2021

Vision Problems? Here's a Guide to Which Specialist Is Right for You

Vision Problems? Here`s a Guide to Which Specialist Is Right for YouSUNDAY, Jan. 17, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- If you're having eye problems, you may not know which type of specialist to consult.Here's some help from experts who explain the roles of an optometrist, ophthalmologist, pediatric ophthalmologist, orthoptist and optician.Optometrists provide comprehensive eye care, including evaluations for glasses and contact lenses and common eye diseases."They play a role in monitoring chronic conditions such as cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration and diabetes," Dr. Danielle Natale, an optometrist at the Krieger Eye Institute in Baltimore, said in an institute news release. They can also treat acute eye problems such as pink eye or sties.Ophthalmologists are physicians who have completed four years of medical school and four years of residency...

COVID Pandemic Shortened U.S. Life Expectancy by More...

15 January 2021
COVID Pandemic Shortened U.S. Life Expectancy by More Than a YearFRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The COVID-19 pandemic significantly shortened life expectancy in the United States, especially among Black people and Hispanics, a new study says.With more than 336,000 COVID-19 deaths nationwide last year, researchers decided to examine the pandemic's impact on life expectancy.The projection: Due to pandemic deaths, life expectancy at birth for Americans will shrink by 1.13 years, to 77.48 years.That's the largest single-year decline in at least 40 years, resulting in the lowest estimated life expectancy since 2003, according to the authors.Their findings revealed significant racial differences that underscore the pandemic's heavy toll on racial and ethnic minority groups. The study projects a 0.68-year decline in life expectancy for white...

Aphasia Affects Brain Similar to Alzheimer's, But...

13 January 2021
Aphasia Affects Brain Similar to Alzheimer`s, But Without Memory LossWEDNESDAY, Jan. 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A rare brain disease that causes loss of language skills doesn't lead to memory loss, a new study finds.The condition is called primary progressive aphasia and about 40% of people who have it have underlying Alzheimer's disease, according to researchers. Their study was published online Jan. 13 in the journal Neurology."While we knew that the memories of people with primary progressive aphasia were not affected at first, we did not know if they maintained their memory functioning over years," said study author Dr. M. Marsel Mesulam, director of the Center for Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer's Disease at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago. "This has been difficult to determine because most memory tests rely on...

What Shoes Work Best With Arthritic Knees?

13 January 2021
What Shoes Work Best With Arthritic Knees?WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Lots of Americans suffer from painful arthritic knees, but a new study finds that wearing the right type of shoe may help ease discomfort.Patients with knee arthritis will achieve greater pain relief by opting for sturdy and supportive shoes rather than flat flexible footwear, researchers in Australia found."A 'sturdy supportive shoe' is a shoe that gives stability to the foot, via motion control features such as arch support," explained study author Rana Hinman, a professor of physiotherapy at the University of Melbourne. "It also has a thick, cushioned heel and a rigid sole that does not bend easily." In contrast, Hinman noted, "a 'flat flexible shoe' is more lightweight, contains no arch support or motion control features, has a low heel...

Weight Training Benefits Older Women, Men Equally, Study Shows

11 January 2021
Weight Training Benefits Older Women, Men Equally, Study ShowsMONDAY, Jan. 11, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to pumping iron, women have as much to gain as men.A new study compared the results of women and men aged 50 to 90 who started resistance training exercise programs, finding that though men were more likely to gain absolute muscle size, their gains were on par with women's relative to body size."Historically, people tended to believe that men adapted to a greater degree from resistance training compared to women," said senior study author Amanda (Mandy) Hagstrom, exercise science lecturer at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia."The differences we found primarily relate to how we look at the data -- that is, absolutely or relatively. 'Absolute' looks at the overall gains, while 'relative' is a percentage based on...
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