Latest Senior Health News

7May
2020

AHA News: Caregiving Is Never Easy, and COVID-19 Has Made It Harder

AHA News: Caregiving Is Never Easy, and COVID-19 Has Made It HarderTHURSDAY, May 7, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- Melia Wilkinson cares for her husband, Kerry, who in 2014 had a massive stroke. Today, the 57-year-old has no use of his left hand, limited use of his left leg, and relies on a cane to get around the house. Kerry can do many things on his own, Melia said, but she helps him with daily activities, such as dressing, and manages his medical care. While caregiving has always been challenging, the era of COVID-19 is fraught with new anxiety. "We have nobody," she said. "I worry if I get COVID, there isn't a person who could step in." The couple and their teenage daughter live near Seattle in King County, Washington, an early U.S. coronavirus hotbed, and far from relatives. Since the virus appeared, Melia has discontinued housekeeping...

AHA News: Hearing Loss and the Connection to Alzheimer's...

6 May 2020
AHA News: Hearing Loss and the Connection to Alzheimer`s Disease, DementiaWEDNESDAY, May 6, 2020 (American Heart Association News) -- Sound has the power to stimulate the brain, which is why hearing loss has the potential to have a profound effect on health – especially among older adults. About 1 in 3 people in the United States between the ages of 65 and 74 has hearing loss, according to the National Institutes of Health. A 2016 study in the American Journal of Public Health found about two-thirds of adults ages 70 or older suffer from hearing impairment that may affect daily communication. Hearing loss is associated with cognitive decline, though more research is needed to determine the degree of the connection, said Dr. Costantino Iadecola, director of the Feil Family Brain and Mind Research Institute at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City. A...

First Good Evidence That Brain Hits 'Replay' While You Sleep

5 May 2020
First Good Evidence That Brain Hits `Replay` While You SleepTUESDAY, May 5, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- If you've ever wondered what your brain is doing while you sleep, a new study gives the first direct evidence that it's busy "replaying" our waking experiences. The finding comes from a research project called BrainGate, which is testing new technology for people who are paralyzed or have lost a limb. Participants have "micro-electrodes" implanted in their brains, to allow them to exert mind control over assistive devices or prosthetic limbs. The work also let researchers catch a glimpse of what happens in the brain during rest -- specifically after participants had played a new game. It turned out that the same brain cells that were firing during the game kept firing as people drifted into light sleep. In a nutshell, the brain seemed to be...

Common Treatment May Not Help Seniors With Underactive...

4 May 2020
Common Treatment May Not Help Seniors With Underactive ThyroidMONDAY, May 4, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The medication Synthroid (levothyroxine) is often used to treat a condition called subclinical hypothyroidism, but a new study suggests the treatment might be a waste of time. For the study, researchers followed 638 people aged 65 and older with subclinical hypothyroidism, also known as mild thyroid failure. About half of the patients were given the medication, and half were given an inactive placebo. After one year, there was no difference in symptoms between the participants who received levothyroxine and those who received the placebo, the investigators found. "Levothyroxine is one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in the U.S.," said lead study author Dr. Maria de Montmollin, from the University of Bern in Switzerland. But she...

Heart Attacks, Strokes Are Declining Among People With Diabetes

1 May 2020
Heart Attacks, Strokes Are Declining Among People With DiabetesFRIDAY, May 1, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- An Australian study has good news for people with type 2 diabetes -- fewer people with diabetes are having heart attacks and strokes compared to 20 years ago. Heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular complications have declined in the general population, too. But the decreases among people with diabetes have outpaced those for the general population, the researchers said. Senior author Dr. Timothy Davis, from the University of Western Australia, called the findings reassuring. They show that modern management of blood sugar and other risk factors "is having the desired effect on chronic vascular complications," he said. But not all of his findings were positive. "Although life expectancy is increasing in both groups, the difference...
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