Latest Senior Health News

15Dec
2022

Biden Administration Calls for Crackdown on Misleading Medicare Ads

Biden Administration Calls for Crackdown on Misleading Medicare AdsTHURSDAY, Dec. 15, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Medicare Advantage ads that are confusing or misleading could be banned under a new rule that was proposed Wednesday by the Biden administration to protect seniors.Nearly half of all seniors or people with disabilities who are enrolled in the Medicare program through the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) have Medicare Advantage plans. “CMS released a proposed rule today that takes important steps to hold Medicare Advantage plans accountable for providing high quality coverage and care to enrollees,” CMS administrator Chiquita Brooks-LaSure said in a news release. “The rule also strengthens Medicare prescription drug coverage and implements an important provision of the Inflation Reduction Act to help more people with...

Caring for Kids and Aging Parents: The 'Sandwich'...

15 December 2022
Caring for Kids and Aging Parents: The `Sandwich` Generation Is Under StrainTHURSDAY, Dec. 15, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one-quarter of all American adults who care for an elderly parent also care for a child at the same time, a new study reveals.And when compared with those who only have a parent under their watch, members of the so-called “sandwich generation” — namely caregivers of both the old and the young — are much more likely to struggle with money problems, emotional trouble and exhaustion, the researchers found."There is actually little research evidence characterizing this group,” said lead study author Lianlian Lei, a health services researcher in the department of psychiatry at the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor. “So, our team aimed to fill that gap and provide a national estimate describing this group of caregivers, and...

U.S. Deaths Drop in 2022, But Still Higher Than...

15 December 2022
U.S. Deaths Drop in 2022, But Still Higher Than Pre-Pandemic LevelsTHURSDAY, Dec. 15, 2022 (HealthDay News) – More than two years after the pandemic began, there is a bit of good news on death rates in the United States: They should be lower this year than during the past two years once final numbers are tallied.Still, they have not dropped to levels seen before COVID swept across the country, preliminary data shows.Deaths are expected to remain about 13% higher than 2019 numbers for 2022. But they should be 7% lower than in 2021 and 3% lower than in 2020, based on an estimate of the first 11 months of 2022, the Associated Press reported.Though the death rate typically goes up annually as the population grows, so many people died during the first two years of the pandemic that it sped the pace. Unless there is a big surge this month, this could be...

Pandemic's Two-Year Global Death Toll May Be Close to 15...

14 December 2022
Pandemic`s Two-Year Global Death Toll May Be Close to 15 MillionWEDNESDAY, Dec. 14, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 15 million people likely died as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 and 2021, nearly three times more than previously reported, a new World Health Organization study estimates.The researchers said the COVID-19 pandemic caused about 4.5 million more deaths than would have been expected in 2020, and 10.4 million more in 2021, according to the report published online Dec. 14 in the journal Nature.By comparison, heart disease was the leading worldwide cause of death in 2019 with nearly 9 million deaths.Based on these numbers, “we would expect COVID-19 to be among the leading causes of death in 2020 and the leading cause of death in 2021,” the study authors concluded.India, Russia, Indonesia, the United States, Brazil and Mexico...

Exercise, Mindfulness May Not Boost Seniors' Thinking, Memory

13 December 2022
Exercise, Mindfulness May Not Boost Seniors` Thinking, MemoryTUESDAY, Dec. 13, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise and mindfulness are known for their health benefits, but a new study found that didn’t extend to boosting memory or thinking skills in healthy seniors. That doesn’t mean these activities wouldn’t be beneficial for memory if practiced for a longer period of time or in adults with impairments, the researchers noted, just that there were not apparent benefits during the study.“We know beyond any doubt that exercise is good for older adults, that it can lower risk for cardiac [heart] problems, strengthen bones, improve mood and have other beneficial effects — and there has been some thought that it also might improve cognitive [thinking] function,” said study first author Dr. Eric Lenze. He is head of the department of...
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