Latest Senior Health News

13Apr
2020

Certain Gene Might Help Shield At-Risk People From Alzheimer's

MONDAY, April 13, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- People who carry a gene called APOE4 face an increased risk of Alzheimer's. But that effect may be lessened if they got luckier with a different gene, researchers have found. Scientists have long known that the APOE gene is the strongest genetic influence over whether people develop Alzheimer's late in life. Those who carry a form of the gene called E4 have a higher-than-average risk. However, not all APOE4 carriers develop Alzheimer's -- and it's important to understand what protects those people, said study co-author Dr. Michael Greicius, an associate professor of neurology at Stanford University School of Medicine in California. Based on his team's findings, a lot may ride on another gene, called klotho. Among APOE4 carriers, those who...

Brain Plaques Signal Alzheimer's Even Before Other...

13 April 2020
MONDAY, April 13, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Even before symptoms develop, the brains of people with early Alzheimer's disease have high levels of amyloid protein plaques, a new study reveals. Those levels in older adults with no dementia symptoms are associated with a family history of disease, lower scores on thinking/memory tests, and declines in daily mental function. The first findings from the so-called A4 study funded by the U.S. National Institute on Aging (NIA) were published recently in the journal JAMA Neurology. A4 stands for Anti-Amyloid Treatment in Asymptomatic Alzheimer's Disease. The study -- due for completion in late 2022 -- is an ongoing trial that was launched in 2014. It's investigating whether the drug solanezumab can slow mental decline associated with elevated...

Sheltering at Home? Take Steps to Prevent Injuries From...

12 April 2020
SUNDAY, April 12, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- As you shelter at home during the coronavirus pandemic, eliminate hazards inside that could lead to falls, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) suggests. Preventing injuries will help avoid putting added strain on a health care system struggling to treat COVID-19 patients, academy spokesman Dr. Todd Swenning said. One out of five falls causes a serious injury, such as a broken bone or even head trauma, he added. "While common perception is that falls only happen to older populations, the truth is that anyone is susceptible, especially with increased family members in the home or changes to your daily routine," Swenning said in an academy news release. "The good news is that most falls can be prevented with a few simple...

Therapy by Phone Helps Parkinson's Patients Manage...

10 April 2020
FRIDAY, April 10, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- A type of talk therapy by phone may help treat depression in people with Parkinson's disease, researchers say. Depression is common in Parkinson's disease patients. It's associated with faster physical and mental decline, but is often overlooked and undertreated. While cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has shown promise in easing depression in people with Parkinson's, many don't have access to therapists who understand Parkinson's. This study, published online April 1 in the journal Neurology, assessed the effectiveness of CBT by telephone. "These results are exciting," said study author Roseanne Dobkin, an associate professor of psychiatry at Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School in Piscataway, N.J. "They show that specialized...

How to Connect With Nursing Home Patients in Quarantine

9 April 2020
THURSDAY, April 9, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. nursing homes, assisted living centers and other long-term care facilities have closed their doors to outsiders due to the coronavirus pandemic, making it difficult for residents and their families to stay connected. The Alzheimer's Foundation of America (AFA) has some advice for making this difficult situation better. "Right now, families across the country cannot visit their relatives in long-term care settings, and while they can't be there with them in person, they can, and should, still be there for them," said Charles Fuschillo, president and chief executive officer of the AFA. "There are other ways that individuals can remain connected with a loved one with Alzheimer's from anywhere," he noted in a foundation news...
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