Latest Senior Health News

17Sep
2021

Trial Into Antioxidant for Parkinson's Disease Yields Disappointing Results

Trial Into Antioxidant for Parkinson`s Disease Yields Disappointing ResultsFRIDAY, Sept. 17, 2021 (HealthDay News) – Researchers hoped to show that the natural antioxidant urate could delay Parkinson's disease progression, but a study completed at Massachusetts General Hospital dashed those expectations.The trial enrolled nearly 300 individuals recently diagnosed with early Parkinson's disease, which affects the body's motor system. Symptoms such as tremors, stiff limbs and balance problems progress gradually, and there is no known cure.The research team found no significant difference in the rate of disease progression for those given the metabolite inosine for two years compared to the placebo group. Inosine raises levels of urate in the brain and blood. It has appeared neuroprotective in preclinical models. The inosine did not prove beneficial, and...

Special 'Strategies' Can Help People With Parkinson's...

16 September 2021
Special `Strategies` Can Help People With Parkinson`s Walk, But Many Patients UnawareTHURSDAY, Sept. 16, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Movement can be very difficult for people with Parkinson's disease, as shaking and stiffness play havoc with balance, coordination and gait.There are many different tricks Parkinson's patients can use to improve their walking and avoid injury from a bad tumble — but a new study reveals that people often have to figure them out on their own, with no help from either a doctor or physical therapist.Nearly one-quarter of Parkinson's patients have never tried well-known strategies proven to help improve movement, according to a report published online recently in Neurology."While compensation strategies are commonly used by persons with Parkinson's disease, their knowledge on the full spectrum of available strategies to improve walking are...

After an ICU Stay, Social Support Crucial for Seniors'...

15 September 2021
After an ICU Stay, Social Support Crucial for Seniors` SurvivalWEDNESDAY, Sept. 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Older adults who are socially isolated are more likely to experience serious disability or die after a stay in the intensive care unit (ICU), new research reveals."This important research finding sheds light on a crucial health care issue that has become more dire during the COVID-19 pandemic," said Dr. E. Albert Reece, dean of the University of Maryland School of Medicine, in Baltimore. "We need to find innovative ways to socially connect with our older, more isolated patients after they suffer through a critical illness. Further research is needed to determine which interventions work best."Social isolation has long been recognized as a public health concern that can lead to development of impaired thinking, disability and frailty in...

Turning 65 Brings Big Health Care Cost Savings, Study Finds

15 September 2021
Turning 65 Brings Big Health Care Cost Savings, Study FindsWEDNESDAY, Sept. 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- When Americans are eligible for Medicare at age 65, they see a significant drop in their out-of-pocket medical costs.Lowering the eligibility age would save even more, especially for people with the highest out-of-pocket costs, according to a new study."Medicare really improves financial risk protection for older adults, and reducing the age of Medicare eligibility would go a long way in reducing the financial burden of health care spending for those who are not quite 65," said lead author Dr. John Scott. He is an assistant professor of cardiac surgery at the University of Michigan Medical School, in Ann Arbor.For the study, Scott's team looked at out-of-pocket health care costs for people between their late 50s and early 70s, including...

Multigenerational Study Finds Links Between ADHD, Dementia Risk

14 September 2021
Multigenerational Study Finds Links Between ADHD, Dementia RiskTUESDAY, Sept. 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) appears to be somehow linked to risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease, a new multigenerational study has found.Parents and grandparents of people with ADHD have a higher risk of Alzheimer's and dementia than people with no ADHD in their family, Swedish researchers said.Specifically, parents of an ADHD child have a 34% higher risk of dementia and 55% higher risk of Alzheimer's, the results showed. Grandparents have about an 11% increased risk of either condition."ADHD is associated with dementia across generations," said lead researcher Le Zhang, a doctoral candidate with the Karolinska Institute's department of medical epidemiology and biostatistics, in Stockholm. "Our study calls attention...
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