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Good News for Parents: Many Preemie Babies Grow Up Fine 22Oct
2019

Good News for Parents: Many Preemie Babies Grow Up Fine

TUESDAY, Oct. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Having a premature baby can be frightening for parents, but new research delivers a calming finding: Many premature babies end up as healthy adults without major...
1 in 4 Parents Say No to Play Date Invites

1 in 4 Parents Say No to Play Date Invites

22 October 2019
TUESDAY, Oct. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. parents are selective about their children's play dates, with nearly one-quarter refusing invitations because they're not comfortable leaving their child in the...
TUESDAY, Oct. 22, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Many U.S. parents are selective about their children's play dates, with nearly one-quarter refusing invitations because they're not comfortable leaving their child in the other parent's care, a new survey finds. Their main concerns about play dates include children being unwatched, hearing inappropriate language, getting into medications and harmful substances, and getting injured, according to the C.S. Mott Children's Hospital National Poll on Children's Health at the University of Michigan. "Play dates allow children to develop independence, gain experience interacting with other children in an unstructured setting, and have fun with a friend," poll co-director Sarah Clark said in a university news release. "Before parents send their child...
Can Testosterone Make Women Better Runners?

Can Testosterone Make Women Better Runners?

16 October 2019
WEDNESDAY, Oct. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A little bit of testosterone cream might help women run faster longer, a new study suggests. Some female athletes have naturally high testosterone levels that are similar...
WEDNESDAY, Oct. 16, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A little bit of testosterone cream might help women run faster longer, a new study suggests. Some female athletes have naturally high testosterone levels that are similar to men, and there is controversy over whether it's fair to allow them to compete against female athletes with normal testosterone levels. There's a lack of clear evidence on how testosterone levels affect women's athletic performance. To learn more, Swedish researchers gave 48 physically active, healthy women between the ages of 18 and 35 either 10 milligrams (mg) of testosterone cream or 10 mg of a placebo cream every day for 10 weeks. The researchers, led by Angelica Linden Hirschberg from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, assessed how testosterone levels...
Breast Milk Combats Growth of Bad Bacteria

Breast Milk Combats Growth of Bad Bacteria

15 October 2019
TUESDAY, Oct. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say they have identified a compound in breast milk that combats the growth of infection-causing bacteria in infants. The compound is called glycerol monolaurate...
TUESDAY, Oct. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say they have identified a compound in breast milk that combats the growth of infection-causing bacteria in infants. The compound is called glycerol monolaurate (GML), and the amount of GML in human breast milk is more than 200 times higher than in cow's milk. Infant formula has no GML, according to the study. Along with fighting harmful bacteria, GML promotes the growth of beneficial bacteria. "Our findings demonstrate that high levels of GML are unique to human breast milk and strongly inhibit growth of pathogenic bacteria," senior author Dr. Donald Leung, professor of pediatrics at National Jewish Health in Denver, said in a hospital news release. The study found that human breast milk inhibits the growth of the harmful...
Chlamydia Can Harm Male Fertility
15 October 2019

Chlamydia Can Harm Male Fertility

TUESDAY, Oct. 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Undiagnosed chlamydia infection can harm male fertility, a new study suggests. "Chlamydia infection has been associated with women's infertility but much less is known about its impact on male infertility, particularly if men do not experience symptoms, which is estimated to be in about 50% of cases," said study leader Ken Beagley, a professor of immunology at Queensland University of Technology in Australia. "When people have no symptoms, they can unknowingly pass on the infection to sexual partners," Beagley added in a university news release . The Australian research is the first to find the sexually transmitted disease in testicular tissue biopsies of infertile men with no identified cause for their infertility. Chlamydia was found in...
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