Latest Women's Health News

22Oct
2020

Heart Conditions Could Raise Risk of Torn Aorta During Pregnancy

Heart Conditions Could Raise Risk of Torn Aorta During PregnancyTHURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnancy can increase the risk of a rare, dangerous heart condition called aortic dissection, researchers report. This is especially true for women with underlying heart conditions that can go undetected. Aortic dissections -- which affect 3 in 100,000 people per year -- cause the layers of the aorta to tear, and blood to pool or leak instead of flow normally. Patients require lifesaving care. Researchers analyzed data from 29 women who were unexpectedly hospitalized for aortic dissection while pregnant. Most already had a heart condition that hadn't been diagnosed in many cases. Aortic diseases and conditions such as Marfan syndrome or Loeys-Dietz syndrome are often found in women who have an aortic dissection while pregnant, the...

COVID-19 More Common in Pregnant Hispanics Than Other...

22 October 2020
COVID-19 More Common in Pregnant Hispanics Than Other Moms-to-Be: StudyTHURSDAY, Oct. 22, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Hispanic mothers-to-be in the southern United States are almost twice as likely to have COVID-19 as non-Hispanic women, a new study finds. The researchers also found that those with government health insurance were more likely to test positive for the coronavirus than women with private insurance. For the study, pregnant women were routinely tested for COVID-19 as they went to a Houston hospital for delivery, said researcher Dr. Beth Pineles. "It's important to test everyone because if you only test people who are symptomatic, you'll get a lot more people who test positive," explained Pineles, a maternal-fetal medicine fellow with McGovern Medical School at University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UT Health). "Universal...

Fewer Painful Procedures Could Help Preemies' Brain...

21 October 2020
Fewer Painful Procedures Could Help Preemies` Brain Development: StudyWEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Giving fewer needle sticks to premature newborns in the intensive care unit may improve growth of a key brain area, a new study suggests. The thalamus relays sensory data from the body to the rest of the brain, where it registers as pain, touch or temperature. For the study, researchers compared 86 premature infants who had a catheter placed in their central veins and central or peripheral arteries for more than two weeks with 57 infants who had a catheter for less time. The catheters act as portals for blood draws, nutrition and medication, reducing the need for individual needle pokes. Infants who had central lines for longer periods had fewer needle sticks and fewer painful procedures. Those babies also had a bigger thalamus....

Nurses Can Make the Difference for New Moms' Breastfeeding

21 October 2020
Nurses Can Make the Difference for New Moms` BreastfeedingWEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- One key to breastfeeding success? Having enough hospital nurses to ensure that new moms get top-notch care. Hospitals with higher rates of exclusive breastfeeding had nurses who provided more consistent care, according to a new report. That care included helping moms have skin-to-skin contact with their babies and breastfeed within an hour of giving birth. Nurses also provided education and encouragement, made referrals to lactation consultants, and kept healthy birth parents and babies together. "Nurses make substantial, often unrecognized, contributions to public health during pregnancy, and during and following birth," said study author Audrey Lyndon, assistant dean for clinical research at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing in New...

Could Mom's Thyroid Levels Influence ADHD in Kids?

21 October 2020
Could Mom`s Thyroid Levels Influence ADHD in Kids?WEDNESDAY, Oct. 21, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Low levels of thyroid hormone during pregnancy may contribute to the development of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in the child, new research suggests. The study found that children born to mothers with low thyroid hormone levels during the first trimester of pregnancy had a 28% increased risk of being diagnosed with ADHD later. Thyroid hormones play an important role in the growth and development of the fetal brain, especially during the first trimester of pregnancy, the researchers said. "The thyroid is important in pregnancy and can have long-term impacts," said study lead author Morgan Peltier. He's an associate professor in the departments of clinical obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive medicine at NYU Winthrop...
RSS
1345678910Last
HealthDay

Copyright © 2018 HealthDay. All rights reserved.