Latest Women's Health News

27Apr
2022

Kids Who Witness Domestic Violence May Suffer Mentally for Decades

Kids Who Witness Domestic Violence May Suffer Mentally for DecadesWEDNESDAY, April 27, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Witnessing violence between your parents is traumatic when it happens, but a new study finds that trauma can raise your risk of depression and other mental health problems.The study included more than 17,700 Canadian adults who took part in a national survey on mental health. Of those respondents, 326 said they witnessed parental domestic violence more than 10 times before age 16, which was defined as chronic.Among those who were exposed to chronic parental domestic violence during childhood, 22.5% had major depression at some point in their life, 15% had an anxiety disorder and nearly 27% had a substance abuse disorder. In comparison, the rates among people with no history of violence between their parents were 9%, 7% and 19%,...

Pandemic Medicaid Rules Allowed More Women to Stay...

27 April 2022
Pandemic Medicaid Rules Allowed More Women to Stay Insured After ChildbirthWEDNESDAY, April 27, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Far fewer U.S. women lost health insurance coverage after giving birth during the COVID-19 pandemic than in previous years, likely due to a federal law that prevented Medicaid from dropping people, researchers say. But they noted that the Families First Coronavirus Response Act, which was signed into law in March 2020, is set to expire in July 2022."The Coronavirus Response Act was a boon for families in that it allowed postpartum people on Medicaid to hold on to their health insurance," said study co-author Erica Eliason, a postdoctoral researcher at Brown University's School of Public Health."Many people will lose postpartum Medicaid coverage when the public health emergency ends unless states decide to extend Medicaid for a full year...

Taken Prior to Sex, New Combo Pill May Prevent Pregnancy...

26 April 2022
Taken Prior to Sex, New Combo Pill May Prevent Pregnancy for DaysTUESDAY, April 26, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Imagine a birth control pill a woman can take before having sex that prevents pregnancy for the next three to five days.This may become a reality, according to a small, new study.The traditional birth control pill is taken daily, while emergency contraceptive pills are taken after sex to prevent pregnancy from occurring, but there isn't an ideal "on-demand" option to take at the time of sex -- yet."Many people still have unmet contraceptive needs," said study author Dr. Erica Cahill, an obstetrician-gynecologist at Stanford University. "This is especially true for people looking for a method that they only have to use when sexually active that is more effective and less intrusive than condoms, diaphragms, withdrawal or spermicide, the only...

White Women Tend to Get Better Pain Management After...

25 April 2022
White Women Tend to Get Better Pain Management After ChildbirthMONDAY, April 25, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- After childbirth, some women who received an epidural for pain will develop a debilitating headache. But minority women are less likely than white moms to receive the treatment that can provide relief, according to a new study.Researchers also found that even when women from minority groups received this care, it was more likely to be delayed."There's a gap in the quality of care that's being delivered to minority women," said study co-author Dr. Allison Lee, an anesthesiologist at Columbia University Irving Medical Center in New York City. "We can't completely explain all the reasons looking at retrospective data, but we know that there's a gap, and that needs to be addressed."While past research has focused on racial and ethnic disparities...

Among Minority Women, Low Vitamin D May Raise Breast Cancer Risk

25 April 2022
Among Minority Women, Low Vitamin D May Raise Breast Cancer RiskMONDAY, April 25, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Insufficient vitamin D may play a role in breast cancer, especially among minority women, new research indicates.Black and Hispanic American women with low vitamin D levels have a higher risk of breast cancer than those with sufficient vitamin D levels, researchers found. The findings suggest that vitamin D may help protect these groups of women against breast cancer, according to the researchers.The study was published online April 25 in the journal Cancer."Together with prior studies on this topic, this article suggests that vitamin D may be associated with reduced risk of breast cancer, including among women who self-identify as Black, African-American, Hispanic or Latina," said study co-author Katie O'Brien, of the U.S. National Institute...
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