Latest Women's Health News

18Mar
2021

Kids' ER Visits for Swallowed Magnets Soared After U.S. Lifted Sales Ban

Kids` ER Visits for Swallowed Magnets Soared After U.S. Lifted Sales BanTHURSDAY, March 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Calls to U.S. poison centers about incidents involving children and high-powered magnets surged more than 400% after a court overturned a ban on the magnets, a new study finds."Regulations on these products were effective, and the dramatic increase in the number of high-powered magnet related injuries since the ban was lifted - even compared to pre-ban numbers - is alarming," said Dr. Leah Middelberg. She's lead author of the study and emergency medicine physician at Nationwide Children's Hospital, in Columbus, Ohio. The small magnets began showing up in toys in the early 2000s and have caused thousands of injuries. They're considered among the most dangerous ingestion hazards in kids, because when more than one is swallowed, the magnets...

Black Women More Prone to Postmenopausal Weight Gain...

18 March 2021
Black Women More Prone to Postmenopausal Weight Gain Than White WomenTHURSDAY, March 18, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Black American women are more likely to gain weight after menopause than white women, and a number of factors may underlie the difference, researchers say.They analyzed data from nearly 71,000 American women who had gone through menopause and were enrolled in a long-term health study.The analysis found that Black women were more than 50% more likely to have a weight gain of 10% after menopause than white women. The findings were recently published in the journal PLOS ONE."This finding suggests that efforts to reduce the disparity in postmenopausal weight gain in non-Hispanic Blacks and non-Hispanic Whites should focus on preventing excess weight gain in non-Hispanic Black women who are normal weight at baseline," said lead author Christopher...

Scientists Create First Lab Model of Human 'Pre-Embryo'...

17 March 2021
Scientists Create First Lab Model of Human `Pre-Embryo` for Research PurposesWEDNESDAY, March 17, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Research into miscarriages, infertility and birth defects is now primed to undergo revolutionary advances, thanks to the creation in the lab of an early stage of human embryos by two separate international teams of scientists.Both teams were able to use human cells to create artificial blastocysts, an early stage of conception that occurs a few days after egg fertilization but prior to the implantation and development of an embryo in the uterus.Until now, research into human blastocysts relied on embryo donations from in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures, which were scarce and difficult to obtain.But the procedures created by the two teams can be used to efficiently create hundreds of blastocysts for use in lab research, Jose Polo,...

Most Women Can Give Birth Naturally Even When Water...

17 March 2021
Most Women Can Give Birth Naturally Even When Water Breaks Early: StudyWEDNESDAY, March 17, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Most women can have a natural childbirth even if labor doesn't begin soon after their water breaks, according to a new study.This situation occurs in about 11% of pregnant women who carry to term. Labor is typically induced in such cases.But University of Michigan researchers found there is no significant increased risk to mother or infant in waiting awhile for labor to begin on its own — an approach called expectant management.The study included more than 2,300 U.S. women cared for by a midwestern midwifery service between January 2016 and December 2018.In 12% of those women, the amniotic sac ruptured early — commonly referred to as water breaking. Of those, 53% decided to wait at home for labor to begin; 36% were expectantly managed...

Doubly Good: Healthy Living Cuts Your Odds for the 2 Leading Killers

16 March 2021
Doubly Good: Healthy Living Cuts Your Odds for the 2 Leading KillersTUESDAY, March 16, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The same lifestyle habits that protect the heart can also curb the risk of a range of cancers, a large new study confirms.The study of more than 20,000 U.S. adults found both bad news and good news.People with risk factors for heart disease also faced increased odds of developing cancer over the next 15 years. On the other hand, people who followed a heart-healthy lifestyle cut their risk of a cancer diagnosis.Experts said the findings are no surprise. The American Cancer Society (ACS) has estimated that close to half of cancer deaths in the United States are linked to modifiable factors -- including poor diet, smoking, lack of exercise and obesity.But the study drives home an important message, according to Marjorie McCullough, senior...
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