Latest Women's Health News

16Apr
2021

Pregnancy Raises the Risk for Kidney Stones

Pregnancy Raises the Risk for Kidney StonesFRIDAY, April 16, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Kidney stones can happen to anyone, but now a new study confirms that being pregnant may increase your risk of developing them.Previous research has suggested that a number of pregnancy-related changes in the body can contribute to kidney stone formation, but this study is the first to provide evidence of that link, according to the researchers.For the study, the Mayo Clinic team reviewed the medical records of nearly 3,000 women from 1984 to 2012, including 945 who had a first-time symptomatic kidney stone and a control group of 1,890 age-matched women.The researchers concluded that pregnancy increases the risk of a first-time symptomatic kidney stone, and that the risk is highest close to delivery and then declines by one year after...

Stress Not Always a Trigger for Relapse in Eating...

15 April 2021
Stress Not Always a Trigger for Relapse in Eating Disorders: StudyTHURSDAY, April 15, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Stress does not trigger binge eating in people with eating disorders, new research suggests.The findings challenge a common theory that's never been directly tested in patients, according to the study authors.Their research included 85 women (22 with anorexia, 33 with bulimia and a control group of 30 without an eating disorder). The study participants were assessed for two days to determine how stress affected their eating habits.The women also had MRI brain scans to assess brain activity."The idea was to see what happened when these women were stressed. Did it affect key regions of the brain important for self-control, and did that in turn lead to increases in food intake? What we found surprised us and goes counter to the prevailing...

America's STD Rate at Record High Again: CDC

14 April 2021
America`s STD Rate at Record High Again: CDCWEDNESDAY, April 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- There's another epidemic sweeping the United States: sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).Statistics for 2019 -- the latest data available from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- show that STD rates in the United States hit a new high again for the sixth straight year. In 2019, nearly 2.5 million Americans had an infection of chlamydia, gonorrhea or syphilis, the CDC said. And early data from 2020 suggest that these trends are continuing.It's a dramatic and unnecessary comeback for illnesses Americans had nearly defeated."Less than 20 years ago, gonorrhea rates in the U.S. were at historic lows, syphilis was close to elimination, and advances in chlamydia diagnostics made it easier to detect infections," researcher Dr....

A Woman's Exposure to DDT Could Affect Her...

14 April 2021
A Woman`s Exposure to DDT Could Affect Her Granddaughter`s Health TodayWEDNESDAY, April 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A long-banned pesticide may be having health effects that ripple across generations, a new study suggests.At issue is DDT, a once widely used pesticide that was banned in the United States in 1972. That ban, however, was not the end of the story.DDT is a persistent organic pollutant, a group of chemicals that are slow to break down and linger in the environment for years. So people can still be exposed to DDT through the food chain, particularly fatty animal products.In addition, exposure to DDT in the womb has been linked to a number of longer-term health issues, including obesity and certain cancers.The new study goes even further, the researchers said.It found that young women whose grandmothers had higher DDT levels during pregnancy...

Mom and Baby's Tale of Survival After Severe COVID Strikes in Pregnancy

14 April 2021
Mom and Baby`s Tale of Survival After Severe COVID Strikes in PregnancyWEDNESDAY, April 14, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- The emotional toll of having a baby can be huge under any circumstance, but what if you didn't know you gave birth until two weeks later, and you weren't able to hold your baby in your arms for more than a month?That was the reality for Yvette Camacho of Fontana, Calif.She contracted a severe case of COVID-19 when she was nearly seven months pregnant and had to have an emergency cesarean section under general anesthesia in an effort to keep her and the baby alive.Before she got the virus, Camacho was a healthy 30-year-old experiencing a normal pregnancy -- albeit one during a global pandemic. As an employee at a patio furniture company, she shifted between working from home and going to the office while raising her 7-year-old son, Ethan,...
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