Latest Women's Health News

13May
2021

Good Bacteria Aren't Present in Baby's Gut Before Birth

Good Bacteria Aren`t Present in Baby`s Gut Before BirthTHURSDAY, May 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Bacteria don't set up house in the human gut until after birth, a new study finds. Gut bacteria are vital for digestion and overall health, but when researchers examined the stool (meconium) from 20 infants collected during breech cesarean deliveries, they found these critical germs show up in the gut after birth, not before."The key takeaway from our study is we are not colonized before birth. Rather, our relationship with our gut bacteria emerges after birth and during infancy," said co-senior study author Katherine Kennedy, a PhD student at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Recent studies claiming that gut bacteria appears before birth are controversial. These studies have been criticized for the ways they control for...

Debunking Social Media Myth, Study Finds COVID Vaccine...

12 May 2021
Debunking Social Media Myth, Study Finds COVID Vaccine Won`t Harm PlacentaWEDNESDAY, May 12, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Contrary to misleading reports spread on social media, a new study finds the COVID-19 vaccine does no damage to the placenta in pregnancy. In a study of placentas from patients who were vaccinated for COVID-19 during pregnancy, researchers found no evidence of any harm."The placenta is like the black box in an airplane. If something goes wrong with a pregnancy, we usually see changes in the placenta that can help us figure out what happened," said lead researcher Dr. Jeffery Goldstein. He is an assistant professor of pathology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, in Chicago. "From what we can tell, the COVID vaccine does not damage the placenta," Goldstein said in a Northwestern news release. At the same time, said...

Gene Therapy Uses HIV to Rescue Kids Born Without Immune...

12 May 2021
Gene Therapy Uses HIV to Rescue Kids Born Without Immune SystemWEDNESDAY, May 12, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Cora Oakley is a rough-and-tumble 4-year-old who loves gymnastics and outdoor activities, particularly if it involves bouncing on a trampoline.It's hard to tell from looking at her that she was born without an immune system. Kids with this condition can acquire dangerous, life-threatening infections from day-to-day activities as simple as going to school or playing with friends."I remember asking the doctor if she was going to die, and he said to me, 'I hope not,'" remembers her mother, Chelsea Oakley, 38, of Morristown, N.J. "It was everything you didn't want to hear as a new mom."Instead, Cora now has essentially a normal immune system, thanks to an experimental gene therapy that journeyed inside her newborn body and fixed the genetic...

In Girls as Young as 7, Weight May Predict Odds for...

11 May 2021
In Girls as Young as 7, Weight May Predict Odds for Eating DisorderTUESDAY, May 11, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Could there be a way to tell years in advance which girls are more likely to develop eating disorders?New research from Denmark suggests that childhood body mass index (BMI) may offer important clues. BMI is an estimate of body fat based on height and weight.The new research linked lower BMI as early as age 7 with a higher risk of anorexia, an eating disorder in which people severely restrict calorie intake. It also found an association between higher BMI and being overweight with an increased risk of bulimia, a binge-eating disorder in which episodes of extreme eating are followed by forced vomiting or fasting."There are many factors that influence the development of eating disorders," said lead author Dr. Britt Wang Jensen, of Bispebjerg and...

Obesity Raises Odds for Many Common Cancers

10 May 2021
Obesity Raises Odds for Many Common CancersMONDAY, May 10, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Being obese or overweight can increase the odds of developing several types of cancers, new research from the United Kingdom reveals.But shedding the excess pounds can lower the risk, researchers say. Reducing obesity cuts the risk for endometrial cancer by 44% and uterine cancer by 39%, and could also prevent 18% of kidney cancers and 17% of stomach and liver cancers, according to the study."It all depends on keeping the weight off," said lead researcher Carlos Celis-Morales of the BHF Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences at the University of Glasgow in Scotland. He noted that many people lose weight only to regain it back -- and then some."What we need is kind of a long-term healthy weight and people that achieve that will reduce...
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