Latest Women's Health News

25Oct
2022

Too Often, Women Aren't Told of Sexual Side Effects of Cancer Treatments

Too Often, Women Aren`t Told of Sexual Side Effects of Cancer TreatmentsTUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- When a man has cancer in an area that affects sexual function, his doctor is likely to discuss it with him.But the same is not true for a woman who has cancer in a sex organ, according to new research. Investigators found 9 in 10 men were asked about their sexual health, yet only 1 in 10 women received the same care. "There seems to be a big disparity in the way we approach sexual dysfunction with our patients, where female patients are asked about sexual issues much less often than male patients are," said lead author Dr. Jamie Takayesu. She is a radiation oncology resident physician at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center."Equally importantly, we see this trend on a national level in clinical trials," Takayesu said.The findings...

Woman Sues L'Oreal Over Claim Hair Straightener Spurred...

25 October 2022
Woman Sues L`Oreal Over Claim Hair Straightener Spurred Uterine CancerTUESDAY, Oct. 25, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- A Missouri woman has sued L’Oréal and several other beauty product companies, alleging that their hair-straightening products caused her uterine cancer.The lawsuit claims that Jenny Mitchell’s cancer “was directly and proximately caused by her regular and prolonged exposure to phthalates and other endocrine-disrupting chemicals found in defendants’ hair care products.” Mitchell, now 32, was diagnosed with cancer on Aug. 10, 2018, and had a hysterectomy the following month. “At that time, at the age of 28, my dreams of becoming a mother were gone,” Mitchell told CNN.Mitchell first used chemical relaxers in third grade. She used the products from about 2000 to March 2022. “As most young African-American girls, chemical relaxers,...

U.S. Child Hunger Spiked in Weeks After Child Tax...

24 October 2022
U.S. Child Hunger Spiked in Weeks After Child Tax Credits RepealedMONDAY, Oct. 24, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Child tax credits had a huge impact in U.S. households that struggle to afford food.And after those credits ended, many low-income American families with children had trouble getting enough to eat.Food insufficiency increased substantially, by about 25%, between January and July after the Child Tax Credit payments stopped on Jan. 15, 2022.Black families, Hispanic families, and Indigenous and immigrant families were especially hard hit, according to researchers from Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) and Boston Medical Center (BMC).The researchers said the increase in food insufficiency is an urgent problem. Poor nutrition uniquely affects the health and well-being of growing children, they explained in a university news...

Sleep-Deprived Kids Will Snack More: Study

24 October 2022
Sleep-Deprived Kids Will Snack More: StudyMONDAY, Oct. 24, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Experts studying kids' sleep and eating habits have learned more about a potential reason for childhood obesity.Kids who are deprived of sleep tend to eat more calories the next day, researchers found. And some of those extra calories come from less-healthy, sugar-laden snacks or treats."When children lost sleep, overall they ate an extra 74 calories per day, caused by an increase of 96 calories per day in non-core foods such as crisps and chocolate, which potentially increases the risk of obesity," said Jill Haszard, a biostatistician at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand. "Such a difference could easily explain why not getting enough sleep increases the risk of obesity in children," she said in a university news release.The...

Almost All Adolescents Who Begin Gender-Affirming Hormones Continue Into Adulthood: Study

21 October 2022
Almost All Adolescents Who Begin Gender-Affirming Hormones Continue Into Adulthood: StudyFRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- When young adolescents strongly identify with a gender that does not match their gender at birth, one option is to offer a reversible treatment that can delay the onset of puberty.If the desire to transition endures, that delay can be followed with a second step: hormone treatments designed to trigger physical changes that match a young person's true sense of identity. But that begs the question: how soon is too soon? According to a new Dutch study, the answer is clear: years after young teens initiate puberty suppression and hormone treatment, nearly all continue to embrace the transition process as young adults."This study is the first in its kind," noted lead author Dr. Marianne van der Loos, an internal medicine physician at the Centre of...
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