Latest Women's Health News

21Oct
2022

New Biden Plan Would Help Pregnant Women Fight Opioid Addiction

New Biden Plan Would Help Pregnant Women Fight Opioid AddictionFRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnant women addicted to opioids have both a compelling reason to change and a harder time getting medications to battle their substance use disorder.Now, a new plan from the Biden administration would expand the use of medications to treat addiction in pregnant women through federal court and health programs. "This is a bold statement, a big moment, coming from the president and the vice president, to show that pregnancy is the golden opportunity to help women get into recovery," Dr. Anna Lembke, medical director of addiction medicine at Stanford University, told the New York Times.The White House was expected on Friday to release a report on the initiative, which would use the Justice Department, the Department of Veterans Affairs and the...

Kept Home Under Lockdown, U.S. Couples May Have Spurred...

21 October 2022
Kept Home Under Lockdown, U.S. Couples May Have Spurred a `Baby Bump`FRIDAY, Oct. 21, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The pandemic brought about a lot of changes in people’s lives. For many, that included a new baby.The United States saw a “baby bump” in 2021 described in a new study as “the first major reversal in declining U.S. fertility rates since 2007.”It was the opposite of what early forecasts predicted.“There was less financial insecurity in the short run, but there was also less financial insecurity in terms of people's expectations," said study co-author Hannes Schwandt. He is an economist at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill. "And both of those made it a much milder shock in terms of the fertility response than the typical recession,” Schwandt said in a Northwestern news release.The findings were recently published by the...

Use of Hair Straighteners Tied to Doubling of Risk for...

20 October 2022
Use of Hair Straighteners Tied to Doubling of Risk for Uterine CancerTHURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Women who regularly use chemical hair straighteners may be more prone to developing uterine cancer, a new large government study suggests.The study, which followed nearly 34,000 U.S. women over a decade, found that those who frequently used hair straighteners were 2.5 times more likely to develop uterine cancer, versus non-users. "Frequent" was defined as more than four times in the past year.Experts cautioned that the findings do not prove cause and effect. And given that uterine cancer is relatively uncommon, even the increased risk linked to hair straighteners is small.Frequent users had a 4% chance of developing the cancer by age 70, versus a 1.6% chance among non-users, the investigators found."The overall risk is not large, and chemical...

Homicide a Leading Cause of Death for Pregnant U.S. Women

20 October 2022
Homicide a Leading Cause of Death for Pregnant U.S. WomenTHURSDAY, Oct. 20, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- It's not high blood pressure, hemorrhage or sepsis that is more likely to kill pregnant women -- it's their husbands and boyfriends.Homicide is a leading cause of death in pregnant women in the United States, and the risk is growing, researchers warned in a new study published Oct. 19 in the BMJ.It's "a shocking situation linked to a lethal combination of intimate partner violence and firearms," the researchers said in a journal news release. They were led by Rebecca Lawn, a postdoctoral research fellow at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston.Ending male violence in the United States, including gun violence, could save the lives of hundreds of women and their unborn children every year, the investigators said.Intimate partner...

FDA Panel Votes for Removal of Drug Meant to Prevent Preterm Births

19 October 2022
FDA Panel Votes for Removal of Drug Meant to Prevent Preterm BirthsWEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- A U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory committee on Wednesday voted to recommend that a controversial drug meant to prevent premature births be pulled from the market.FDA officials have said they want to withdraw the medication, Makena, because of lack of evidence that it works and due to its side effects. The drug was initially allowed as part of the agency’s accelerated approval program, which lets a medication launch after promising early results while larger studies test it further.But in a 14-1 vote for removal of the drug, the FDA’s Obstetrics, Reproductive and Urologic Drugs Advisory Committee closed a three-day meeting on the evidence supporting Makena. It is the only drug approved in the United States to prevent preterm...
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