Latest Women's Health News

5Mar
2021

Formaldehyde in Hair Straighteners Prompts FDA Warning

Formaldehyde in Hair Straighteners Prompts FDA WarningFRIDAY, March 5, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- You might decide your frizzy locks aren't so bad after all, given a new warning from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that most hair straightening/smoothing products release formaldehyde gas, a human carcinogen. Being exposed to formaldehyde for longer periods of time and at higher concentrations increases the health risks, according to the FDA. Formaldehyde exposure can cause a host of complaints, including eye problems or irritation; nervous system problems such as headaches and dizziness; and respiratory problems such as sore or scratchy throat, cough or wheezing. Nausea, chest pain, vomiting and rashes are also associated with formaldehyde exposure.Long-term effects can include chronic headaches, asthma, contact dermatitis (a red,...

Reassuring News for Women Taking Epilepsy Meds While...

5 March 2021
Reassuring News for Women Taking Epilepsy Meds While PregnantFRIDAY, March 5, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Toddlers whose mothers took certain epilepsy drugs during pregnancy are unlikely to have development delays, researchers say. The study may help clear up lingering doubts about use of the drugs by moms-to-be.Controlling seizures is crucial, of course. "Having a seizure during pregnancy may not only harm the mother but possibly the baby as well, so seizure control is an important part of prenatal care," noted study author Dr. Kimford Meador, professor of neurology at Stanford University Medical Center in California. However, "antiseizure drugs are known to cause birth defects or neurobehavioral problems," Meador added in an American Academy of Neurology news release. "These effects vary widely, with some having very low risks but others having...

Is Your Teen Unmotivated at School? That Might Change

4 March 2021
Is Your Teen Unmotivated at School? That Might ChangeTHURSDAY, March 4, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- If your teen seems disinterested in school, new research suggests there's a good chance that things will get better over time."Our results point to a more hopeful picture for students who start out with lower levels of motivation," said study senior author Kui Xie, a professor of educational studies at Ohio State University in ColumbusThe study included 1,670 students at 11 public high schools in central and northeastern Ohio who were followed for two years. They were in grades 9 to 11 at the start of the study.Overall, the students' motivation to learn improved during the study period. For example, the percentage of students who were self-motivated to learn rose from 8% in the first year to over 11% in the second year.Meanwhile, the...

Women With Type 1 Diabetes May Have Fewer Childbearing...

4 March 2021
Women With Type 1 Diabetes May Have Fewer Childbearing Years: StudyTHURSDAY, March 4, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Women with type 1 diabetes may have a shorter length of time to conceive and bear children compared to those without the disease, new research suggests.The hormone insulin plays an important part in regulating female reproductive function, and people with type 1 diabetes don't make enough insulin on their own. But little was known about how type 1 diabetes affects the start of menopause, when a woman's ability to bear children ends.To find out, researchers looked at nearly 300 women and compared women with type 1 diabetes to those without diabetes.The findings showed that compared to women without diabetes, those with type 1 start menstruating later and enter menopause earlier. The researchers said this is because insulin deficiency and high...

Skipping Mammograms Raises a Woman's Odds for Breast Cancer Death

2 March 2021
Skipping Mammograms Raises a Woman`s Odds for Breast Cancer DeathTUESDAY, March 2, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Don't skip your breast cancer screening mammogram.This is the overarching message of an extended study of more than a half-million Swedish women. Those who missed even one recommended screening mammogram were more likely to die from breast cancer, the study found.The new findings -- which appear March 2 in the journal Radiology -- are concerning given the widespread delays and cancellations of preventative cancer screenings that took place during early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic."You can save your own life by making sure to get your regular, routine mammogram," said Dr. Marisa Weiss, founder and chief medical officer of Breastcancer.org and Breasthealth.org in Ardmore, Pa. "Getting your mammogram won't increase your risk for COVID," said...
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