Latest Women's Health News

19Oct
2022

Black Babies Born Through Fertility Treatments Face Worse Survival Than White Infants: Study

Black Babies Born Through Fertility Treatments Face Worse Survival Than White Infants: StudyWEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- It's well known that Black women in the United States have an increased risk of childbirth complications. Now, a large new study finds even larger racial disparities when women conceive through infertility treatments.Researchers found that among U.S. women who'd undergone various infertility treatments, Black women had a substantially higher risk of losing their baby soon before or after birth, compared to white women.That risk was also elevated, though to a lesser degree, among Hispanic and Asian women.Overall, relatively few women lost their baby. But the risk was three to four times higher for Black mothers, versus white women.In fact, racial disparities were greater among women who conceived through infertility treatment than among those...

Genes for Stillbirth May Be Passed Down by Male Relatives

19 October 2022
Genes for Stillbirth May Be Passed Down by Male RelativesWEDNESDAY, Oct. 19, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Stillbirth is heartbreaking tragedy for parents, but exactly what raises the risk of it remains elusive.Certain health conditions in a pregnant woman can be a factor, but new research came up with a surprising finding: Stillbirth risk appears to be inherited through male members of the family on either side."Stillbirth is one of those problems that is so tragic and life-changing," said study co-author Dr. Jessica Page, an assistant professor in the department of obstetrics and gynecology at University of Utah Health and Intermountain Healthcare. "It is especially frustrating when you don't have a good answer for why it happens," she said in a university news release. "This knowledge may give us the opportunity to change how we risk stratify...

Online Sexual Abuse of Kids Is Common; Perps Usually...

18 October 2022
Online Sexual Abuse of Kids Is Common; Perps Usually Friends, PartnersTUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Substantial numbers of kids and teens are being tracked, lured and sexually abused online, and adult strangers aren’t always the perps.In many cases, it’s friends and dating partners who are doing the grooming, a new study shows.The prevailing image of online sexual abuse is an older predator who seeks out kids online, but the researchers said that’s not really the case. “The majority of perpetrators are offline acquaintances,” said study author David Finkelhor, director of the Crimes Against Children Research Center at the University of New Hampshire, in Durham. “Boyfriends and other friends are misusing images they have received or taken non-consensually, and adults known from their face-to-face life are using technology to get...

Early Elementary School Start Times May Not Harm Kids'...

18 October 2022
Early Elementary School Start Times May Not Harm Kids` GradesTUESDAY, Oct. 18, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- While later school start times can benefit middle and high school students, elementary school kids do just fine with an earlier wake-up call, according to new research.An earlier bell in elementary school may mean less sleep, but it doesn't affect learning for those children, according to research in a pair of studies published Oct. 13 in the journal Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis. Most other studies have looked at older students who have been found to benefit from later openings because of biological changes in their sleep."We found earlier start times for elementary schoolers do not have the same negative effects as they do for middle and high schoolers," said study co-author Sarah Crittenden Fuller, a research associate...

FDA, Company Square Off in Hearing Over Drug Meant to Prevent Preterm Births

17 October 2022
FDA, Company Square Off in Hearing Over Drug Meant to Prevent Preterm BirthsMONDAY, Oct. 17, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- In a three-day hearing that began Monday, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration advisory committee will give the maker of a drug meant to prevent premature births a chance to show why its drug should not be pulled off the market.FDA officials have said they want to withdraw the medication, Makena, because of lack of evidence that it works and due to its side effects. The drug was initially allowed as part of the agency’s accelerated approval program, which lets a medication launch after promising early results while larger studies test it further. “Based on the evidence shown today, Makena is not shown to be effective,” Dr. Patrizia Cavazzoni, director of the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in opening remarks on Monday,...
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