Latest Women's Health News

13Apr
2021

Newborns Won't Get COVID Through Infected Mom's Breast Milk: Study

Newborns Won`t Get COVID Through Infected Mom`s Breast Milk: StudyTUESDAY, April 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A new study offers more reassurance that mothers infected with SARS-CoV-2 can safely breastfeed their babies.The study of 55 infants born to moms with COVID-19 found that none contracted the virus -- even though most started getting breast milk in the hospital.Researchers said the findings support existing advice from public health authorities. Last year, the World Health Organization (WHO) said that moms with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 can continue breastfeeding.The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said that breast milk is "not a likely source" of SARS-CoV-2 transmission, and that infected moms can breastfeed as long as they take some precautions."If you wash your hands and wear a mask, there's no reason you can't...

Ovarian Cancer Diagnosis Can Take Big Toll on Women's...

12 April 2021
Ovarian Cancer Diagnosis Can Take Big Toll on Women`s Mental HealthMONDAY, April 12, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Ovarian cancer is a tough diagnosis to cope with, and now a new study finds these patients face a much higher risk of depression and other mental health issues.And the emotional anguish exacted a significant toll: The researchers also found it was associated with an increased risk of death during the study period among these women."Mental health issues are important for cancer patients as they face major disruptions to their lives and deal with the toxic side effects of cancer treatment," said study lead author Siqi Hu. She is a PhD candidate in the University of Utah's department of family and preventive medicine and Huntsman Cancer Institute, in Salt Lake City."We wanted to examine mental health in ovarian cancer patients, who often face a...

Urinary Incontinence Surgery Won't Raise a Woman's...

12 April 2021
Urinary Incontinence Surgery Won`t Raise a Woman`s Cancer RiskNDAY, April 12, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Women face no increased risk of pelvic cancer -- tumors of the bladder, cervix and ovaries -- if they have surgery to treat stress urinary incontinence (SUI), a new study finds.Concerns about possible complications and safety issues related to use of surgical mesh -- particularly for a condition called pelvic organ prolapse, and also for SUI -- have made some patients reluctant to have mesh-based procedures.So in this study, researchers analyzed data on nearly 75,000 Canadian women who had an SUI surgery between 2002 and 2015. In 85% of those cases, transvaginal mesh was used. The SUI surgery patients were compared with a control group of more than 5.5 million women who didn't have the surgery."In a very large population with extended follow-up,...

Obesity May Help Trigger Heavier Periods: Study

9 April 2021
Obesity May Help Trigger Heavier Periods: StudyFRIDAY, April 9, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Obese women can be more likely to have heavy monthly periods, and now new research hints at why.In addition to stirring up inflammation, excess weight may slow down the uterine repair process, U.K. researchers reported. Menstruation occurs when the lining of the uterus (endometrium) sheds each month, but the healing process stops the bleeding so the lining can build back up. Heavy periods -- defined as needing to change your tampon or pad after less than two hours and/or passing large blood clots -- can take a dramatic toll on a woman's quality of life, said study author Dr. Jacqueline Maybin, a researcher at the MRC Centre for Reproductive Health at the University of Edinburgh. "Some people have such heavy periods that they can't leave the...

The Future of Cancer for Americans

8 April 2021
The Future of Cancer for AmericansTHURSDAY, April 8, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- At first glance, it appears that little will change between now and 2040 when it comes to the types of cancers that people develop and that kill them, a new forecast shows.Breast, melanoma, lung and colon cancers are expected to be the most common types of cancers in the United States, and patients die most often from lung, pancreatic, liver and colorectal cancers, according to the latest projections.But beneath the surface, changes are occurring due to a shift in the nation's top causes of cancer, and those trends are likely to affect treatment and research for decades, experts say.Lung cancer cases and deaths are expected to continue to decline, likely due to the success of anti-smoking campaigns. However, deaths from obesity-related...
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